PRISONER   OF   WAR
 
CIRCULAR   NO.1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
REGULATIONS   GOVERNING
 
 
PRISONERS   OF   WAR
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     
     
 
WAR   DEPARTMENT
 
 
WASHINGTON
 
 
24   SEPTEMBER,   1934
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
PRISONER OF WAR  )
WAR DEPARTMENT      
CURCULAR No. 1      )
Washington, 24 September 1943.
REGULATIONS GOVERNING
 
PRISONERS OF WAR
 
 
 
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
 
 
Chapter
 
Page
   
I
  Introduction
1
  A.  General
1
  B.  Definitions
3
  C.  Jurisdiction of The Provost Marshal General
5
  D.  Jurisdiction of Service Commanders and Camp Commanders
7
   
II
  Prisoner of War Facilities
7
  A.  Designation
7
  B.  Construction of Prisoner of War Camps
8
  C.  Officer Prisoners
10
   
III
  Processing of Prisoners
10
  A.  Personnel Record
10
  B.  Serial Numbers
11
  C.  Personal Effects
16
   
IV
  Organization of Prisoners
18
   
V
  Supplies
21
     
VI
  Medical Attention and Sanitation
30
   
VII
  Canteens
31
   
VIII
  Employment and Compensation
33
    A.  Employment of Prisoners
33
 
 
 
 
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  B.  Compensation
36
  C.  Compensation for Injured Prisoners
37
  D.  Care of Sick and Injured
38
  E.  Rest
38
   
IX
  Social Privileges
39
   
X
  Discipline
43
   
XI
  Military Courtesies
46
   
XII
  Communications, Parcels, Books, Newspapers and Magazines
47
  A.  Notification of Address
47
  B.  Letters and Cards
47
  C.  Parcels
51
  D.  Form of Address
52
  E.  Cables, Telegrams and Telephone Calls
53
  F.  Red Cross Express Messages
53
  G.  Books
54
  H.  Newspapers and Magazines
55
   
XIII
  Censorship
56
  A.  Letters and Cards
56
  B.  Parcels
58
  C.  Cables and Telegrams
58
  D.  Books
59
  E.  Miscellaneous
59
   
XIV
  Complaints and Requests
60
   
XV
  Death and Burial
62
 
 
 
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PRISONERS OF WAR
I.  Introduction.
 
 
 
        A.  General.
 
 
 
 
                1.  These regulations are published for the guidance of those concerned with the military custody of prisoners of war in continental United States, and will also be applied in theaters outside the continental United States to such extent as is deemed feasible by the theater commanders concerned.  They supersede conflicting Army Regulations, Circulars and Manuals, including Tentative Internee Regulations enlisted Civilian Enemy Aliens and Prisoners of War (without date but published April 1942); Memorandum #3,  Request of Foreign Officials to Visit Internment Camps - 24 April 1942;  Memorandum #4, Internees' Complaints - 24 April 1942;  Letter 17 September 1942, Internee Mail;  Letter 3 November 1942, Internee Mail;  Letter 26 November 1942, Free Postage for Internee Mail;  Letter 9 December 1942, Internee Mail and Telegrams; Letter 14 January 1943, Routing of Incoming Domestic Internee Mail via District Postal Censor; Letter 29 January1943, Red Cross Express Messages;  Letter 2 February 1943, Censorship of Books and Parcels;  Letter 12 February 1943, Internee Parcels;  Letter 25 March 1943, Newspapers and Magazines for Prisoners of War;  Letter 26 March 1943, Internee Mail;  W.D. Memorandum No. S340-9-43, 19 May 1943, Handling of Internee Mail;  W.D. Memorandum
 
 
 
     
     
 
 

 

 
 

 
W580-6-43, 21 August 1943, Compensation for Injured Prisoners of War;  W.D. Memorandum S580-5-43, 30 July 1943, Payment of Prisoner of War Orderlies;  W.D. Memoranda W580-3-43, 27 June 1943, Mo. W580-3-43, 16 July 1943, and No. W580-3-43, 21 July 1943, Prisoners of War Supplies; W.D. Memorandum No. W580-1-43, 15 June 1943, Serial Numbers for Prisoners of War;  W.D. Memoranda AG 383.6 (3-26-43)  OB-S SPMGA-M, 9 April 1943, and No. W580-1-43, 15 June 1943, Serial Numbers for Prisoners of War.  These are superseded by reason of their inclusion of these regulations or otherwise.
 
 
                2.  In general, prisoner of war camps will be operated in the same manner as other military establishments.  The basic principles of organization and decentralization as indicated in section 103.02 Army Service Forces Organizational Manual July 1943 will govern. 
 
 
                  3.  The United States is a party to the two Conventions signed at Geneva, Switzerland July 27, 1929, 47 Stat.233; 47 Stat. 286; FM 27-10.  One is relative to the treatment of prisoners of war and the other is for the amelioration of the condition of the wounded and sick of armies in the field.  These Regulations are intended to supplement the Geneva Conventions and will be considered and applied according to the spirit as well as the letter of these Conventions. 
 
 
 
                4.  Article 2 of the first Convention referred to provides:  "Prisoners of war are in the power of the hostile Power,
 
 
 
 
- 2 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
but not of the individuals or corps who have captured them.  They must at all times be humanely treated and protected, particularly against acts of violence, insults, and public curiosity.  Measures of reprisal against them are prohibited."
 
 
 
 
                5.  Article 3 of the same Convention provides:  "Prisoners of war have the right to have their person and their honor respected.  Women shall be treated with all regard due to their sex.  Prisoners retain their full civil status.
 
 
 
 
        B.  Definitions.
 
 
 
 
                6.  The term "Geneva Convention" as used in these Regulations refers to the Convention of July 27, 1929, Relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War.
 
 
 
 
                7.  Every person included in the following classes who is captured by the Armed Forces of the United States because of war is while in custody entitled under international law to be recognized and treated as a prisoner of war:
 
 
 
 
                        a.  Members of the enemy Armed Forces, both military and naval, including both combatants and noncombatants in service with those forces, with the exception of protected personnel (chaplains and medical and sanitary personnel).  If it is found necessary to detain protected personnel, they will, pending repatriation, receive treatment no less favorable than that accorded prisoners of war of equivalent rank.
 
 
 
 
                        b.  All persons accompanying or serving with the
 
 
 
 
- 3 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
armed forces of the enemy, whom the captor nation believed it expedient to detain, provided they are in possession of an appropriate certificate of identity from the military authorities of the armed forces which they are accompanying.
 
 
 
 
                        c.  Citizens of an enemy country who rise en masse to defend their territory or district from invasion, who satisfy the requirements of Article 1 or Article 2 of the Hague Regulations (FM 27-10, par. 9a or 9b).
 
 
 
 
                        d.  High civil functionaries, including the sovereign and members of the royal family, the president or chief of a state, and the ministers who direct the policy of a state, whether or not they accompany the enemy Armed Forces.
 
 
 
 
                        e.  Civil officials and diplomatic agents attached to the enemy Armed Forces.
 
 
 
 
                        f.  Persons whose services are of particular use to the hostile army or its government, such as the higher civil officials, diplomatic agents, couriers, guides, etc., also all persons who may be harmful to the opposing state while at liberty, such as prominent and influential political leaders, journalists, local authorities, clergymen, and teachers, in case they incite the people to resistance, may be made prisoners of war.
 
 
 
 
                        g.  Civilians entitled to be treated as prisoners of war under the provisions of subparagraphs b through f above, will be treated as officers or enlisted men in accordance with
 
 
 
 
- 4 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
the information on their certificate of identity, if within the provisions of subparagraph b, or, if not within this subparagraph, in accordance with their duties while with the armed forces, or their standing in civilian life, so far as these can be determined.  In case of doubt, civilians will be treated as enlisted men.
 
 
 
 
                8.  The word "prisoners" as used herein refers to all prisoners of war, save where specific exception is made in the text.  The phrase "officer prisoners" includes warrant officers who have the assimilated rank of commissioned officers and civilian prisoners of war entitled to be treated as such in accordance with the provisions of paragraph 7g above.
 
 
 
 
                9.  The Commanding Officer of a prisoner of war camp will be referred to in these regulations as "Camp Commander."
 
 
 
 
        C.  Jurisdiction of The Provost Marshal General.
 
 
 
 
                10.  Under the provisions of paragraph 7, AR-10-15, the Personnel Division, W.D.G.S., is the agency responsible for plans and policies affecting personnel of the Army of the United States and personnel in the service of the Armed Forces of the United States who are prisoners of war, and enemy prisoners of war including, with respect to enemy prisoners of war in the continental United States, their internment or other disposition, location, employment, treatment, and security.  Within the Army Service Forces, The Provost Marshal General exercises staff supervision over the internment, care and treatment of prisoners and is charged with the application of the terms of the Geneva Convention.  Subject to staff supervision
 
 
 
 
- 5 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
by the Personnel Division, W.D.G.S., The Provost Marshal General's responsibilities include:
 
 
 
 
                        a.  Supervision and execution of War Department policies to make effective the provisions of this Convention.
 
 
 
 
                        b.  The discharge of the War Department's responsibility in the supervision and administration of arrangements between belligerent powers with reference to prisoners of war.
 
 
 
 
                        c.  The supervision and administration of all matters affecting prisoners of war arising under arrangements or dealings with neutral powers or agencies, including the Central Agency for Information in neutral countries, and the PRotecting Powers.
 
 
 
 
                        d.  Formulating the necessary rules and regulations relative to the War Department's responsibility in the control of prisoners of war.
 
 
 
 
                        e.  Coordination with other Federal Agencies of policies and procedures concerning prisoners of war.
 
 
 
 
                        f.  Establishment and operation of the Prisoner of War Information Bureau and the Enemy Alien Information Bureau.
 
 
 
 
                11.  The prisoner of War Information Bureau is established in the Office of The Provost Marshal General pursuant to Article 77 of the Geneva Convention.  This Bureau is charged with the following duties:
 
 
 
 
                        a.  To receive reports and maintain records
 
 
 
 
- 6 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
concerning enemy prisoners and concerning Americans held as prisoners of war by the enemy.
 
 
 
 
                        b.  To collect and maintain current information respecting capture, internments, transfers, releases, exchanges, escapes, hospitalization, deaths, burials, and other information necessary to the record of each prisoner.
 
 
 
 
                        c.  To reply to inquiries concerning prisoners.
 
 
 
 
                        d.  To receive and keep safely the wills of prisoners and personal effects of deceased prisoners.
 
 
 
 
                        e.  To transmit periodically to the Protecting Powers and the Central Agency of the International Red Cross Committee information to facilitate the identification of each prisoner.
 
 
 
 
        D.  Jurisdiction of Service Commanders and Camp Commanders.
 
 
 
 
                12.  Prisoner of war camps will be operated under the direction and supervision of the Commanding General of the appropriate Service Command in accordance with War Department regulations and directives.
 
 
 
 
                13.  The camp commander under the jurisdiction of the post commander, if any, will command the camp and be responsible for its operation, administration, management, and the control and treatment of the prisoners of war in his care.
 
 
 
 
II.  Prisoner of War Facilities.
 
 
 
 
        A.  Designation of Facilities.
 
 
 
 
                14.  Military facilities for the reception, detention,
 
 
 
 
 
 
- 7 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
and internment of prisoners are designated Prisoner of War Collecting Points, Prisoner of War Inclosures and Prisoner of War Camps.
 
 
 
 
                15.  Prisoner of War Collecting Points are localities designated in the areas of front line combat divisions for the assemblage of prisoners, pending examination and arrangement for further evacuation.
 
 
 
 
                16.  Prisoner of War Inclosures are installations with facilities for the processing and temporary detention of prisoners in combat or communication zones.  Inclosures are established by Commanding Generals of Theaters of Operations or field Armies, and in special instances by corps or divisions.
 
 
 
Amended by adding a Par. Sub-camp Side-camp       Cir. #3
                17.  Prisoner of War Camps are installations established for the internment of prisoners.  The address of these camps will follow the designation "Prisoner of War Camp" as a means of identification, for example, Prisoner of War Camp, Alva, Oklahoma, and Prisoner of War Camp, Fort George G. Meade, Maryland.
 
 
                18.  Prisoner of War Compounds are fenced-off subdivisions of prisoner of war camps.
 
 
 
 
        B.  Construction of Prisoner of War Camps.
 
 
 
 
                19.  Prisoner of War camps are constructed at sites approved by the Commanding General, Army Service Forces.  The type of construction of prisoner of war camps is equivalent to that provided for United States troops at base camps.
 
 
 
 
- 8 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
                  20.  The area of each camp will be sufficient to provide space for the necessary buildings for the housing of prisoners and for administration, indoor and outdoor recreation, messing, canteen, showers, latrines, and for other purposes prescribed by the Commanding General, Army Service Forces.
   
                  21.  Prisoner of war camps are surrounded by two fences of the chain link, barbed or woven wire type at least eight feet high, and at least twelve feet apart, with an additional overhang of three feet.  In addition, guard towers are erected in numbers and at intervals as control and internal security require.  The floor of each tower is a minimum of six feet above the top of the fence.  Machine guns, if available, are mounted in each tower.  Additional arms are provided.  Every tower has an unobstructed field of vision, is inclosed in a manner not interfering with the operation of the armament thereon, is heated and provided with search lights.  Each tower is outside the double fence and entrance thereto is by means of a ladder.  Flood lights along the outer fences are placed in a manner to light adequately all approaches to the fences and likely fields of fire from guard towers.  An auxiliary lighting or strong battery system is maintained for the towers as precaution against power failure.
 
 
 
                22.  In theater of operations, shelter for each Prisoner of War Inclosure will be of temporary construction.  Available facilities will be utilized when possible.
 
 
 
 
- 9 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
        C.  Officer Prisoners.
 
 
                23.  Officer prisoners will be sheltered and messed in camps or compounds separate from noncommissioned officers and privates.  They will be provided quarters consistent with their rank.
 
 
 
III.  Processing of Prisoners.
 
 
 
 
        A.  Personnel Record.
 
 
 
 
                24.  Basic Personnel Record, W.D., P.M.G. Form No. 2 will be prepared to the extent possible by the first unit which is able to effect at least partial processing.  This record will contain the name of the prisoner, his serial number, photograph, fingerprints, inventory of personal effects and other personal data.  Typewriters will be used in preparing this record if available, otherwise pen and ink or indelible pencil, in which case names will be written in imitation of printed capitals.  Signatures will be written in black ink if available.
 
 
 
Amended Cir #2       
                25.  The Commanding officer of the prisoner of war inclosure is responsible for the preparation of the Basic Personnel Record unless this record has been completed previously.  The record will be prepared in quadruplicate.  The original will accompany the prisoner and three copies will be forwarded to the Prisoner of War Information Bureau.
 
 
 
 
                26.  Pursuant to agreement between the War and Navy Departments, the Basic Personnel Record for prisoners received from the Navy Department will be accomplished by the Navy in quintuplicate prior to the transfer of the prisoners to the Army.  One copy will
 
 
 
 
- 10 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
be signed and returned to the Navy as a receipt for the prisoner.  Four copies will be delivered to the Army, the original of which will accompany the prisoner, and three will be forwarded to the Prisoner of War Information Bureau.
 
 
        B  Serial Numbers.
 
 
 
                27.  A serial number will be assigned each prisoner.  Numbers assigned under previous regulations will be retained.  Prisoners not already processed will be assigned serial numbers in accordance with the following regulations.
 
 
 
 
                28.  Serial numbers for prisoners captured by the Army of the United States normally will be assigned at the first prisoner of war inclosure or prisoner of war camp to which the prisoner is sent.  The serial numbers for prisoners will consist of two components separated from each other by a dash.  The first component will consist of two symbols as follows:
 
 
 
 
                        a.  The first symbol will be a number designating the command in which the prisoner was captured.  The numbers used are as follows:  1 for Eastern Defense Command;  2 for Greenland Base Command;  3 for Western Sector, Crimson Project;  4 for Eastern Sector, Crimson Project;  5 for Western Defense Command;  6 for Central Defense Command;  7 for Southern Defense Command;  8 for Northwest Service Command;  21 for Caribbean Defense Command;  22 for U.S. Army Forces, South Atlantic;  31 for U.S. Army Forces in the European Theater of Operations;  41 for U.S. Army Forces in the Central Pacific Area;
 
 
 
 
- 11 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
42 for U.S. Army Forces in South Pacific Area;  51 for Commander in Chief, Southwest Pacific Area; 61 for U.S. Army Forces, China, Burma, and India, Forward Echelon;  62 for U.S. Army Forces, China, Burma, and India, Rear Echelon;  71 for U.S. Army Forces in the Middle East; 71 for U.S. Army Forces in Central Africa;  81 for U.S. Forces in the North African Theater of Operations.
 
 
                        b.  The second symbol will be the first letter of the name of the enemy country in whose armed forces the prisoner was serving, e.g., "G" for Germany, "J" for Japan, and "I" for Italy.
 
 
 
                29.  The second Component will consist of an individual number assigned consecutively to each prisoner processed in the appropriate command irrespective of which country he served.  Thus, the first prisoner processed by the U.S. Army Forces in the European Theater of Operations, if a German, would be assigned 31G-1 and the tenth prisoner processed by the same command, if an Italian, would be assigned 31I-10.  The first prisoner processed by the U.S. Army Forces in the Middle East, if a German, would be assigned 71G-1 and the tenth prisoner processed by the U.S. Army Forces in Central Africa, if an Italian, would be assigned 72I-10.
 
 
 
 
                30.  The commanding general of the appropriate command in his discretion may assign blocks of numbers to the subcommands or stations within his command.  Numbers for commands established in the future will be designated by the Commanding General, Army
 
 
 
 
- 12 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
Service Forces.
 
 
                31.  Prisoners transferred to continental United States without having been processed by the capturing command and those captured within the Service Command will be processed by the Service Command at the prisoner of war camp where they are first delivered.  Serial numbers for prisoners in this class will consist of two components.  The first component will contain three symbols.  The first symbol will be the number representing the appropriate Service Command, from one to nine, inclusive.  The second symbol will be a "W" to represent the War Department and to show that the prisoner, except for those captured in the nine service commands, was not processed by the capturing command.  The third symbol will be the first letter of the name of the country he served, e.g., "G" for Germany, "J" for Japan, and "I" for Italy.  The second component will consist of an individual number assigned consecutively to each prisoner processed in the Service Command irrespective of which country he served or where captured.  The first prisoner processed in the Second Service Command, if a German, would be 2WG-1 and the tenth prisoner processed in the same Service Command, if an Italian, would be 2WI-10.
 
 
 
                32.  a.  It is to be expected that many prisoners will arrive in the United States without having been assigned serial numbers.  The preceding paragraph provides for the assignment of serial numbers to prisoners in this category.  These serial numbers will
 
 
 
 
- 13 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
be assigned at the direction of the commanding generals of the respective service commands.  Each commanding general may assign blocks of numbers to the subcommands or stations within his command.
 
Rescinded New Par. Cir. #10
                        b.  With reference to prisoners who arrive in this country without serial numbers, it frequently cannot be determined for a long time whether or not serial numbers in particular cases were assigned overseas.  From the standpoint of identification it is necessary to have serial numbers assigned without too much delay.  The commanding general of each service command may therefore assign serial numbers whenever he deems it necessary to prisoners who arrive in the service command without previously having been assigned numbers, and in instances where it cannot readily be determined whether or not numbers have been previously assigned.  In each case where a second number has been assigned before it was known that one had been assigned previously, the first number will be the controlling one and will be used to identify the prisoner.  The second number, which becomes obsolete, will not be assigned to anyone else.
 
 
Rescinded Cir. #2
                        c.  As soon as prisoners have been processed and assigned serial numbers as hereinbefore designated, three copies of W.D., P.M.G. Form No. 2 (Prisoners of War--Basic Personnel Record) will be forwarded to the Prisoner of War Information Bureau, Provost Marshal General's Office.  The Prisoner of War Information Bureau will also be notified in instances where it
 
 
 
 
- 14 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
becomes known that more than one serial number has been assigned to a prisoner.  This notice will contain the serial number first assigned and also the obsolete number.
 
 
                33.  Pursuant to agreement between the War and Navy Departments, prisoners captured by the United States Navy will be assigned serial numbers by the Navy Department as soon as practicable, following the landing at a naval shore station.  Each serial number will consist of to components, separated by a dash, as follows:  The first component will include the numerical designation of the Naval District in which the shore station is located, and a letter indicating the nationality of the prisoner using a "G" for German, an "I" for Italian and a "J" for Japanese, etc.  The second component will consist of the number assigned to the individual prisoner and the symbol "NA" showing that the prisoner was captured by the Navy.  Each Naval District will assign consecutive numbers as prisoners are received and processed.  As an illustration, the fourth prisoner received and processed at the Naval Shore Station in the Fourteenth Naval District, if a Japanese, would be assigned 14J-4NA, and the twenty-fifth prisoner received and processed in the Fifth Naval District, if a German, would be assigned 5G-25NA.  In lieu of having the numbers run consecutively within a District, the Commandant may, in his discretion, assign any shore activity therein a block of numbers.
 
 
 
                34.  Prisoners captured by Allied Nations and transferred
 
 
 
 
- 15 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
to the custody of the United States will retain the serial numbers assigned by the capturing nation.  If serial numbers have not been assigned by the Allied Nations, numbers will be assigned as though the prisoners had been captured by the Army of the United States.
 
 
        C.  Personal Effects.
 
 
 
                35.  It is the responsibility of the officer in direct custodial charge of prisoners to safeguard the money, valuables and personal effects on the person or in the immediate possession of each prisoner.  Property found in the possession of a prisoner may be in one of four classes:
 
 
 
 
                        a.  Personal effects which he may be allowed to retain.
 
 
 
 
 
                        b.  Personal effects taken from him temporarily but returned as soon as practicable.
 
 
 
 
                        c.  Personal effects which he is not permitted to retain while interned, including money and any article which may be used to facilitate escape.
 
 
 
 
                        d.  Articles which he is not permitted to retain at any time and which will be confiscated.
 
 
 
 
                36.  Each prisoner will be searched individually when captured.  Prisoners captured by Allied Nations will be searched upon delivery to the Armed Forces of the United States.  Prisoners will be permitted to retain clothing, insignia, decorations, identification cards or tags, and helmets and gas
 
 
 
 
- 16 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
masks when necessary.  All equipment and implements of war, ammunition, bombs, explosives or material used in manufacture of explosives, army code or cipher, or army picture, map or sketch of a military or naval installation will be confiscated.  Signal devices, including flash lights, cameras, field glasses, binoculars, radio transmitters and short wave receiving sets will be denied prisoners while interned.  The possession of other articles considered dangerous may be denied prisoners.  The camp commander may receive for safekeeping valuables, clothing, or other personal effects of prisoners.
 
 
                37.  Personal effects which are ultimately to be returned to the prisoner while interned or when released will accompany the prisoner during transfer and be delivered to the camp commander.
 
 
 
                38.  All valuables, clothing and personal effects, including all goods received or taken away from the prisoners except military equipment and implements of war will be inventoried, marked, identified and, when necessary, securely bound or packaged.  It is the responsibility of the officer in charge to insure the safekeeping of all money and other valuables belonging to the prisoners.  Statement of Inventory, W.D., P.M.G. Form No. 3, will be executed in triplicate and signed by the prisoner and the officer in charge.  The duplicate will be given to the prisoner.  The prisoner will place his initials opposite each item returned, on both the original and duplicate receipts.  Any item which has
Amended by Cir.       # 10
 
 
 
- 17 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
been confiscated or the possession of which has been denied other than military equipment and implements of war will be noted accordingly on all receipts.  The original receipt will accompany the prisoner during transfers.  The triplicate receipt will be forwarded to the Prisoner of War Information Bureau.
 
Amended by Cir.       # 10
                39.  Upon each transfer of the prisoner, the personal effects not returned to the prisoner will be delivered to the camp commander or other receiving officer.  The receiving officer will assure himself that the personal effects are in accord with the inventory and receipt in the possession of the prisoner.  He will give the delivering officer a receipt for all money, valuables, personal effects, receipts, inventories and other records received for the prisoner.
 
 
 
                40.  Camp commanders will forward to the Prisoner of War Branch, Military Intelligence Service, War Department, any captured documents containing information relating to battle order, new weapons, intentions or morale.  After review, such documents will be returned to the camp commander for delivery to the prisoner.
 
 
 
 
IV.  Organization of Prisoners.
 
 
 
Amended by Cir.       # 10
                41.  So far as possible, prisoners of more than one nationality or race will not be interned in any one prisoner of war camp.  Upon arrival at camps, prisoners will be assigned to companies of approximately 250 prisoners each.  In the event of transfer from one camp to another within the zone of the interior, prior to departure the prisoners involved will be officially notified of their destination.
 
 
 
 
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                42.  Each company will be commanded by a commissioned officer of the Army of the United States.  There will be assigned also to each company the following military personnel:  1 sergeant, grade to be determined by the Service Command, 1 mess and supply sergeant, 1 corporal company clerk, and if necessary 2 cooks.
Substitute New Par. 42-C
 
 
                43.  At each prisoner of war camp, prisoners will select from their number a spokesman to represent them a agent intermediary before the military authorities and the Protecting Powers.  The selection of the spokesman and his continuance in that capacity will be subject to the approval of the camp commander.  In camps of officer prisoners and assimilies, the senior officer prisoner in the highest grade, unless incapacitated or incompetent, will be recognized as the spokesman.  Medical personnel and chaplains are not considered prisoners of war and are not eligible to act as spokesman of prisoners.  If camps are occupied by both officer and enlisted men prisoners, each of these groups will be represented by its respective spokesmen.  The camp commander in his discretion may authorize the selection by the prisoners of such additional spokesmen for prisoner units as he may deem appropriate.  These additional spokesmen may be removed at the will of the camp commander.
 
 
 
                44.  In addition to their other duties the spokesmen will be responsible for the maintenance and cleanliness of the quarters of their respective units.  They may also be used to relay orders to their units.
 
 
 
 
                45.  Officer prisoners will be assigned orderlies from enlisted prisoners of the same nationality on the basis of one
 
 
 
 
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orderly for each general officer, one for each group of three field officers and one for each group of six company officers.  In addition cooks necessary for officers will be assigned from among enlisted prisoners.
 
Roster Amended Cir. #2
                46.  a.  An additional roster arranged alphabetically showing last name, first name, rank (German abbreviation), internment serial number, date of birth, name of next of kin, address of next of kin (See W.D., P.M.G. Form No. 28, 1 September 1943) will be prepared by each camp commander immediately upon the arrival at the camp of German prisoners of war.  This roster will indicate the SPMGA number and Main number when available.  An initial roster giving last name, first name, rank (Italian abbreviation), internment serial number, place of birth including provence, date of birth, name of next of kin, address of next of kin (See W.D., P.M.G. Form No. 29, 1 September 1943) will be prepared by each camp commander upon the arrival at the camp of Italian prisoners of war.  This roster will indicate the SPMGA number and Main number when available.  These rosters will be forwarded in duplicate direct to the Prisoner of War Information Bureau, Office of The Provost Marshal General.
 
 
 
                        b.   camp roster arranged alphabetically by company containing the same information as initial roster will be forwarded in duplicate quarterly direct to Prisoner of War Information Bureau, Office of The Provost Marshal General.
 
 
 
Rescinded Cir. # 10
                47.  A strength report of prisoners in custody will be submitted to The Provost Marshal General through channels by each camp commander on W.D., P.M.G. Form No. 8 whenever there is a change in number of prisoners.
 
 
 
 
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V.  Supplies.
 
 
                48.  Approved items of clothing and equipage, general supplies, subsistence and fuel will be supplied by the service commander upon requisition.
 
 
 
                49.  Except as circumstances warrant or climate requires, no uniform or suit will be issued as a replacement to a prisoner who is not an officer until the one in which he was captured has become unfit for use.  The uniforms of prisoners will be renovated and used when practicable.  Prisoners will be permitted to wear insignia of rank and decorations.
 
 
 
 
                50.  Except for clothing of officer prisoners and the national uniforms of prisoner enlisted men, outer garments worn by prisoners will be marked in the following manner:
 
 
 
 
                        a.  All coats, shirts, blouses and jackets will be marked across the back with the letters "P W" six inches high and in like manner on the front of each sleeve between the elbow and shoulder with letters four inches high.
 
 
 
 
                        b.  Trousers will be marked in the same manner with letters four inches high across the back immediately below the belt and on the front of each leg immediately above the knee.
 
 
 
 
                        c.  Black indelible ink will be used for stenciling light colored or white clothing and white or light shade of ink or paint with a zinc base will be used on dark clothing.  In the discretion of the camp commander serial numbers or other identification marks may be written or stamped on the inside of any prisoner clothing for identification.
 
 
 
 
- 21 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
                        d.  Each prisoner of war camp will be furnished sets of stencils by the Quartermaster General, through the Service Command, for marking prisoners' clothing.
 
Amended Cir # 2 New Par. Flag & Emblem
                51.  Articles of the United States Army uniform will not be issued unless altered in a manner that will prevent them from being mistaken for parts of the Army uniform.  All outer garments will be dyed dark blue by the Quartermaster before issue to prisoner of war camps.  However, officer prisoners will be permitted to so alter or decorate their uniforms as to permit officer uniforms to be distinguished from those of enlisted prisoners.  Officer prisoners also may be permitted to wear uniforms purchased by themselves of the same general pattern, design and color as their own national uniform.
 
 
Amended Cir. #2 further amended Cir. #10
                52.  The following is a table of allowance of clothing and equipage for prisoners:
 
   
Item                                                          Quantity per individual
   
Bags, Barrack 1
Bed, Sacks 2
Belts, Waist 1
Blankets or Comforters 2
Breeches, cotton, or trousers, working, denim 2 (pair)*
Caps, or Hats cotton 1
Coat, Cotton Khaki or Coat, working, denim 2*
Coats, wool 1
Cots, canvas 1
Drawers, cotton 4 (pair)
Gloves or Mittens 1 (pair)
 
 
* When deemed necessary by the camp commander.
 
 
 
 
- 22 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
Item                                                          Quantity per individual
   
Leggings (When Breeches are issued) 1 (pair)
Overcoats (or suitable substitute) 1
Raincoat (dismounted) 1
Pillows 1
Shirts 2
Shoes 1 (pair)
  A second pair of shoes is authorized for issue when deemed necessary by the camp commander to safeguard the health of prisoners against inclement weather  
Socks 4 (pair)
Trousers or Breeches (wool) 2 (pair)
Undershirts, cotton 4
  Straw or an adequate substitute for bedding may be issued at the rate of 15 pounds per man per month.  
  In addition, the following items are authorized for officer prisoners:  
Cases, pillow 2
Chair, steel or folding 1
Cot, steel or bedstead, wooden 1
Covers, mattress 2**
Mattress 1
Sheets, bed 4
                53.  Items of clothing and equipage will be supplied from the following sources in the indicated order of priority:
                        (1)  Obsolete Stock.
 
 
 
**In lieu of, not in addition to, bed sacks
 
 
 
 
- 23 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
                        (2)  CCC stock, except spruce green outer clothing.
 
                        (3)  Class "X" Stock.
 
                        (4)  Class B Stock
 
                        (5)  New stock, except that new stock of outer clothing and shoes, will be utilized only in cases of emergency.
 
 
 
 
                54.  Toilet articles, barber's and tailor's supplies will be issued in accordance with paragraph 10, AR 600-375, 17 May 1943, which states that the value of such supplies will not exceed one dollar per man per month.  The following items are authorized:
 
 
 
 
Blades, safety razor Laces, shoes
Brooms, whisk Needles
Brushes, shaving Polish, shoe, or dubbin
Brushes, shoe Powder or paste, tooth
Brushes, tooth Razor, safety
Buttons Soap, hand
Clippers, hair Soap, shaving
Combs, medium Thread
Handkerchiefs Towels
 
     
 
                55.  A record of all clothing and equipment will be kept as provided for the enlisted men of the Army.
 
 
 
 
                56.  The following is the table of allowances of general supplies:
 
 
 
 
Item                                                                           Quantity    Remarks and Basis of Issue
     
Chinaware (thick ware:    
       Boat, sauce, 13 oz. capacity 1 Per 10 men
 
 
 
 
- 24 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
Item                                                                           Quantity    Remarks and Basis of Issue
     
        Bowl, general issue or plate, soup 1 Per man
        Bowl, sugar, with cover 17 oz. capacity     1 Per 5 men
        Cup, coffee, unhandled 1 Per man
        Dish, vegetable, 11-7/8 in.    
                 width (Bakers) (Plate, soup    
                 may be substituted) 1 Per 2 men
        Plate, dinner, 9-5/8 in. dia. 1 Per man
        Saucer, coffee 1 Per man
Glassware:    
        Bottle, vinegar, with stoppers, 14 1/2 oz. cap 1 Per 10 men
        Pitcher, syrup, 20 oz. capacity 1 Per 2 men
        Shaker, salt 1 Per 10 men
        Shaker, pepper 1 Per 10 men
        Tumbler 10 oz. capacity 1 Per man
Kitchen Utensils:    
        Bowl, mixing, large 1 Per 150 men
        Brush, meat block, wire 1 Per 150 men
        Cleaver, butchers', 8 in. Blade 1 Per 75 men
        Clock 1 Per mess
        Colander, 6 1/4 in. x 6 1/2 in. 1 Per mess
        Dipper, tin or enamelware 1-2 qt. 1 Per 30 men
        Fork, cook, flesh, 2 tine, 15 in. 1 Per 30 men
        Fork, cook, flesh, 2 tine, 21 in. 1 Per mess
 
 
 
- 25 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
Item                                                                               Quantity    Remarks and Basis of Issue
     
        Peeler, potato 1 Per 25 men
        Pin, rolling   1 Per 150 men
        Pots, stock, with cover, 10 gal. 1 Per 50 men
        Pots, stock, with cover, 15 gal. 1 Per 50 men
        Pots, stock, with cover, 20 gal. 1 Per 75 men
        Saw, butcher, 22 in. 1 Per 75 men
        Scale, weighing, counter, scoop, 10 lbs. 1 Per mess
        Scraper, dough, 6 in. 1 Per 75 men
        Sieve, flour, wood 18 in.   Per 150 men
        Skimmer 1 Per 75 men
        Spatula, wood, 37 in. 1 Per 75 men
        Spoon, basting, 15 in. 1 Per 25 men
        Spoon, basting, 21 in. 1 Per mess
        Spoon, serving, slotted 1 Per 40 men
        Steel, butchers' 10 in.   Per 150 men
        Stone, sharpening 1 Per mess
        Turner, cake, 15 in. 1 Per 40 men
        Whip, egg, 12 in. 1 Per 75 men
        Whip, egg 16 in. 1 Per 75 men
Miscellaneous    
        Axe, handled, chopping, single bit    
        standard grade, 3 1/2 -4 lb. 3 Per company
        Board, wash 1 Per 25 men
        Brooms, corn 1 Per 14 men per month
        Brush, floor, scrubbing, hand 1 Per 14 men per month
 
 
 
- 27 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
Item                                                                               Quantity    Remarks and Basis of Issue
     
        Bucket, general purpose galvanized 14 qt. 1 Per 20 men
        Can, ash or garbage, galvanized with cover      
            (approximately 32 gal.) 1 Per 25 men
        Candles, pounds 1 Per 60 men per day when no other light furnished.
        Handles, mop, spring lever 1 Per 50 men of fraction thereof per annum
        Irons, hand 1 Per company
        Mop, cotton 1 Per 25 men per month
Tablewares    
        Fork, table 1 Per man
        Knife, table grill 1 Per man
        Pitcher, water 5 1/2 qt. 1 Per 10 men
        Platter, meat 1 Per 10 men
        Spoon, table (medium) 1 Per man
        Spoon, table (serving) 1 Per 2 men
        Spoon, tea 1 Per man
                57.  Mess equipment and general supplies will be issued in the following order of priority:
 
 
 
                        a.  Nearest usable non-standard substitute for the prescribed standard item.
 
 
 
 
                        b.  Class B stock.
 
 
 
 
                        c.  New stock when the above classes are not available.
 
 
 
 
                58.  Tools will remain in possession of prisoners only during working hours.
 
 
 
 
- 28 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
                59.  Subsistence for prisoners including officer prisoners will be issued on the basis of Type "A" Field Ration.  Rations may be altered to suit the needs of the various national groups, but in no instance will the money value of the ration exceed that prescribed for enlisted men of the Army nor will food be requisitioned beyond what is actually needed.
 
                60.  The possession or use of fortified or heavy wines or spirituous liquors is forbidden.  Beers or light wines containing not more than 3.2 per centum of alcohol by weight may be permitted at the prisoner's own expense where allowed by War Department instructions, but no prisoner will be allowed more than a total of one quart in twenty-four hours.
 
 
 
                61.  Fuel will be added as necessary.
 
 
 
 
                62.  Expendable supplies are authorized for issue in accordance with allowances prescribed in Circular 1-18, Office of The Quartermaster General, 1 November 1942.
Amended Cir. #3
 
 
 
                63.  One German-English, English-German, or Italian-English, English-Italian or Japanese-English, English-Japanese dictionary will be issued according to the nationality designation of the prisoner of war camp.
 
 
 
 
                64.  Cans, meat, and cups, canteen, are authorized for special issue to prisoners of war under the following conditions:
Amended Cir. #3
 
 
 
                        a.  These items are approved only for prisoners of war assigned to work details who cannot be returned readily to the prisoner of war camp for meals.
 
 
 
 
                        b.  The basis for requisitions to cover these items will state the total prisoner of war capacity of the prisoner of war camp
 
 
 
 
- 29 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
  and specific reasons why their issue is considered necessary.
 
Amended Cir. #3
                        c.  Limited standard meat cans and canteen cups will be issued for this purpose prior to the issuance of the standard items.
 
 
 
VI.  Medical Attention and Sanitation.
 
 
 
 
                65.  Prisoners will be furnished medical and dental treatment identical with that provided for United States troops.  A medical record currently maintained will be prepared for each prisoner.  All pertinent medical or dental records, including immunization and clinical records or essential extracts thereof, will accompany prisoners during transfers.
 
 
 
 
                66.  Prisoners will be given a physical examination upon their first arrival at a prisoner of war camp.  At least once a month thereafter, they will be inspected by a medical officer for the purpose of detecting communicable diseases and vermin infestation.  The general scope of these inspections is indicated in AR 615-250.  In addition, such special inspections, physical examinations and laboratory tests as may be recommended by the surgeon or directed by higher authority will be made from time to time.
 
 
 
 
                67.  As soon as practicable after capture or transfer to a camp, prisoners will be vaccinated against smallpox and inoculated against the typhoid and paratyphoid fevers.  Reimmunizations and immunizations against other diseases will be done when indicated and upon the recommendation of the surgeon.  An immunization register will be kept as a part of the medical record of each prisoner.  After vaccination or inoculation, prisoners may be excused from work for a period recommended by the attending medical officer.
 
 
 
 
- 30 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
                68.  All necessary sanitary and preventative measures will be taken to protect and safeguard the health of prisoners of war, the attending military personnel and the civil population.  When applicable, the sanitary and preventative measures will be those prescribed in AR 40-205 and AR 40-210.  An inspection of the sanitary facilities of the prisoner of war camps and prisoner of war inclosures will be made at least once a month.  Prisoners will observe all sanitary measures necessary to assure the cleanliness and healthfulness of camps and to prevent epidemics.  Insanitary habits will not be tolerated.
 
 
                69.  Prisoners will have at their disposal, day and night, toilet facilities conforming to sanitary rules of the United States Army.
 
 
 
                70.  Prisoners who have had appropriate training will be used as far as possible in sanitary and medical work necessary for the well-being of other prisoners.
Amended by adding all of      Cir. #6 (assignment of medical personnel)  Also add Cir. #8 (Protected personnel)
 
 
VII  Canteens.   
 
 
                71.  a.  Canteens will be established in each prisoner of war camp where prisoners may purchase tobacco, candy, toilet articles, food products and such supplies as may be approved by the camp commander.  Purchases will not be made through any medium other than the camp canteen unless approved by the camp commander.
 
 
                        b.  Canteens operated for prisoners will be separate from any exchange that may exist or b established for military personnel outside of the compound and will not be under the supervision of Army Exchange Service.
 
 
 
- 31 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
                        c.  The camp canteen officer will be appointed by the commanding officer of the prisoner of war camp and will not be connected with any existing exchanges.
 
 
                72.  a.  The canteen will purchase merchandise and supplies from existing Army Exchanges at cost price plus a nominal charge to cover expenses incurred by the exchange.  This charge will not exceed 5%.  The payment of the fee to the Army Exchange Service is not required by canteens.
 
 
 
                        b.  In the event liquidation of a canteen is necessary, resale of the stock on hand to existing Army Exchange is authorized.
 
 
 
 
                73.  a.  All purchases by prisoners at canteens will be made by the use of coupons only.  In the event of transfer, the prisoner will be furnished a credit for the amount of unused canteen coupons legally acquired, by the canteen from which the coupons were originally secured.  This credit will be accepted by the canteen at the station to which a prisoner is transferred for the issuance of a like quantity of canteen coupons.
 
 
 
 
                        b.  Coupons will be issued by the prisoner of war camp canteen under the provisions of Circular 10, War Department 1943 as amended.
 
 
 
 
                74.  a.  The camp commander will regulate the prices to be charged for merchandise sold, which price shall not be more than the local market price.
 
 
 
 
                        b.  Profits from canteen will be held in a Prisoner of War Fund and expended by the camp commander for the benefit of the prisoners as a whole in order to improve their health and well-being.
 
 
 
 
- 32 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
Prisoner of War Funds will be administered in accordance with applicable portions of AR 210-50, 29 December 1942.
 
 
                        c.  The camp canteen records will be available for inspection by prisoner spokesmen.
 
 
 
                75.  In the event of transfer of prisoners from one camp to another a proportionate share of the value of canteen stock and the Prisoner of War Fund will be transferred except:
 
 
 
 
                        a.  When the transfer involves less than ten prisoners.
 
 
 
 
                        b.  No share of the canteen stock will be transferred unless the canteen is liquid and the amount is in excess of one dollar per prisoner.
 
 
 
 
                        c.  No share of the Prisoner of war Fund will be transferred when the total amount of such share is less than $10.00.
 
 
 
 
                        d.  In computing the proportionate share the following procedure will be used:
 
 
 
 
                                (1)  The unobligated balance of net worth of the canteen on the last day of the month preceding the date of transfer (or as of the close of the canteen business month if other than the last day of the month).
 
 
 
 
                                (2)  The actual prisoner of war strength prior to the transfers on the date of transfer.
 
 
 
 
                76.  Subject to the foregoing provisions, where applicable the camp canteens will be conducted in compliance with AR 210-65, 19 March 1943, AR 210-50, 29 December 1942 and all subsequent directives.
 
 
 
 
VIII.  Employment and Compensation.
 
 
 
          A.  Employment of Prisoners.  
     
                  77.  Labor of prisoners, other than officer prisoners, is  
 
 
 
- 33 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
divided into two classes.  The first class includes the labor connected with the administration, management and maintenance of the prisoner of war camp.  The second class includes all types of labor which do not fall into class one.  Among these will be projects undertaken by the United States, one of the states or subdivisions thereof, or by private persons.
 
 
                78.  Labor in class one is primarily for the benefit of prisoners.  It need not be confined to the prisoner of war camp or to the camp area.  Class one labor includes:
 
 
 
                        a.  That which is necessary for the maintenance or repair of the prisoner of war camp compounds including barracks, roads, walks, sewers, sanitary facilities, water pipes, and fences.
 
 
 
 
                        b.  Labor incident to improving or providing for the comfort or health of prisoners, including work connected with the kitchens, canteens, fuel, garbage disposal, hospitals and camp dispensaries.
 
 
 
 
                        c.  Work within the respective prisoner companies as cooks, cook's helpers, tailors, cobblers, barbers, clerks and other persons connected with the interior economy of their companies.  In apportioning work, consideration will be given by the company commander to the education, occupation, or profession of the prisoner.
 
 
 
 
                79.  To the extent practicable, prisoners will be encouraged to raise their own vegetables.  A corresponding reduction may be made in the ration issued by the Quartermaster when prisoner-raised vegetables are available.  Preparing land for cultivation by permanent
 
 
 
 
- 34 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
improvements which increase the value of the land is class two labor if the improvements insure primarily to the benefit of the United States even though the prisoners may be benefited incidentally.
 
 
                80.  Prisoners may be employed on such work projects as are permitted by the Geneva Convention and authorized by War Department directives.  Members of the Army of the United States will not employ them for personal services.
 
 
 
                81.  When prisoners are employed on projects of departments of the United States other than the War Department, or on projects of states or subdivisions thereof, municipal corporations, or private parties, their employment will be under contracts in such form and containing such provisions as may be approved from time to time by the War Department.  In all such cases the War Department will continue to be responsible for guarding, rationing, clothing, and quartering the prisoners, and for providing them with medical attention.  The conditions of employment will at all times be conformable to the provisions and requirements of the Geneva Convention.
 
 
 
 
                82.  Officer prisoners will not be required to work.  If they request suitable work, it shall be secured for them when available.
 
 
 
 
                83.  Non-commissioned officer prisoners will be required to do supervisory work only unless they expressly request work of another type.
 
 
 
 
                84.  Questions or doubts whether any type of work will violate the provisions of the Geneva Convention will be referred to the War Department for decision.  This reference will be addressed to The Provost Marshal General.
 
 
 
 
                85.  Orderlies and cooks for officer prisoners of war will be assigned from prisoner of war companies as provided in Paragraph 45
 
 
 
 
- 35 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
of these Regulations.  Each will be paid by the United States at the rate of eighty cents per day which will be credited to his account.
 
Rescinded by Cir. # 10
                86.  The number of cooks and assistant cooks who will be paid for work in prisoner of war camp messes will in no event exceed the aggregate number authorized for regular army enlisted messes of the same or similar size.  These limitations are as follows:
 
 
 
Size of Company         Cooks                     Assistant Cooks
Over 200 2 3
175-200 2 2
130-174 2 1
Less than 130 1 1
 
 
 
 
                87.  Prisoners will be classified by the attending medical officer according to their ability to work as follows:  (a)  Heavy work,  (b)  Light work,  (c)  Sick - no work.  Lists of prisoners showing the individual labor status of each will be posted from time to time at each prisoner company headquarters.  Except as herein provided, all employable prisoners will perform labor directed by the camp commander provided the labor is commensurate with their physical conditions.
 
 
 
 
        B.  Compensation.
 
 
 
 
                88.  When employed on class two labor, whether in a supervisory capacity or otherwise, prisoners, including officers and non-commissioned officers, will be compensated at the rate of eighty cents per day.  In general there will be no compensation for class one labor.  However, in instances approved by the camp commander where a few prisoners, ordinarily with special qualifications, devote so
 
 
 
 
- 36 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
much time to class one labor that it renders them, as distinguished from the majority of prisoners in the company or camp, unavailable for class two labor, compensation will be paid.
 
 
                89.  When prisoners are employed in continental United States on projects of departments of the United States other than the War Department, or on projects of states or subdivisions thereof, municipal corporations, or private parties, the amount of compensation to be paid to the United States for their labor by the users thereof will be fixed as may be directed from time to time by the War Department at the prescribed rate of eighty cents per day.
 
 
 
                90.  The method of crediting prisoner accounts and their transfer is prescribed in a War Department Circular from time to time.
 
 
 
 
        C.  Compensation for Injured Prisoners.
 
 
 
 
                91.  Each prisoner engaged in labor for pay will be considered an employee of the United States for the purpose of disability compensation, whether he works on a project sponsored by the United States, by a state or subdivision thereof, municipal or private corporation, or by an individual or individuals.
Amended Cir. #3 POW labor Railroads New Par.
 
 
                92.  In the event that a prisoner sustains injury arising out of and in the course of labor for pay, not caused by the willful misconduct of the prisoner, or by the intention to bring about injury or death of himself or another, or by his voluntary intoxication, which prevents him from continuing work for pay, he may be paid at the discretion of the Secretary of War by the War Department at the rate of forty cents per day (a) until he again is able to engage in labor for pay or (b) until is repatriation or (c) until his death.  The occurrence
 
 
 
 
- 37 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
of any one of these three possibilities will terminate disability payment.
 
 
                93.  Claims for compensation under these regulations will be considered by a Board of Officers convened by order of the commanding officer of the prisoner of war camp involved to investigate and make recommendations in the premises.  At lest one member of the board will be a medical officer.  Army Regulations 420-5 will serve as a guide for those concerned with the application of these regulations.  In instances where the commanding officer of the prisoner of war camp approves the recommendation of the board, the decision for payment or nonpayment as the case may be will take effect as ordered by the camp commander, subject, however, to review by The Provost Marshal General.  In instances where the commanding officer disapproves the recommendations of the board the case, without further action, will be referred to The Provost Marshal General for decision.  The original and one copy of the report of the board, after action has been taken by the camp commander, will be forwarded to The Provost Marshal General.
 
 
 
        D.  Care of Sick and Injured.
 
 
 
 
                94.  Prisoners who are sick, or injured will be given the required shelter, food, clothing, medical attention, and, if necessary, hospitalization until they are fully recovered.
 
 
 
 
        E.  Rest.
 
 
 
 
                95.  Prisoners will be allowed a period of rest of twenty-four consecutive hours every week preferably on Sunday.  When emergency
 
 
 
 
- 38 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
requires work on Sunday, the day of rest will be accorded as soon as practicable thereafter and in no event will the interval between successive rest days be longer than nine days.
 
 
IX.  Social Privileges.
 
 
 
                96.  To the extent that prisoner instructors are available, prisoners may organize classes for instruction in language, history, mathematics, or other subjects approved by the Commanding General, Army Service Forces.  A library and reading room may be maintained by the prisoners.  Reading material will be censored before it is made available.
 
 
 
 
                97.  Sports and athletic contests may be sponsored by the prisoners.  Sufficient space, to the extent authorized by the Commanding General, Army Service Forces, will be provided by the camp commander for outdoor and indoor recreational purposes.  Prisoners will be given the privilege of participating in organized calisthenics and athletic contests which will be conducted daily under the supervision of the camp commander or his representative.  Participation in this activity will be optional on the part of the individual prisoners.  It is within the discretion of the camp commander whether or not these activities will be conducted on Sundays.
 
 
 
 
                98.  Furnishings for prisoner recreation buildings in the prisoner of war camps will be provided by and expended under the direction of the Commanding General, Army Service Forces.  Recreational equipment for indoor games and outdoor sports, handicraft tools, fine arts and theatrical accoutrements will be supplied prisoner of war camps as directed by the Commanding General, Army Service Forces upon
 
 
 
 
- 39 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
the authority of a yearly appropriation.  Other available equipment may be selected and allotted by the service commander and camp commander.
 
 
                99.  Duly accredited representatives of the Protecting Powers and the International Red Cross Committee may be accorded the right of access and visitation to and inspection of prisoner of war camps at times previously approved by The Provost Marshal General.  They will be permitted to interview any prisoner, and such interviews will, upon request, be without witnesses.  The International Red Cross Committee has been authorized to conduct recreational and welfare activities at prisoner of war camps.  Upon request of the camp commander concerned, the International Young Men's Christian Associations may be called upon to supplement and extend such work of the International Red Cross Committee when the latter is unable to furnish recreational and welfare services to the extent necessary.  Other relief societies and organizations may be granted the right of access and visitation to prisoner of war camps only by The Provost Marshal General.  Prisoners will not deliver directly any letter, paper, document or article to any representatives of the Protecting Powers or of any relief society or organization.
 
 
 
                100.  Except in unusual circumstances, to be determined by the camp commander, prisoners will be permitted to receive twice each month visitors approved by the camp commander.  Arrangements for visits will be made before the visitor arrives at the camp.  Visits will be held under the supervision of designated military personnel and
 
 
 
 
- 40 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
at the time and place selected by the camp commander.  All visitors must submit to a search before entering the camp and departure therefrom.  Any article, the possession of which is denied prisoners, will be deposited with an officer who will give a receipt therefor.  Articles so deposited will be returned and the receipt taken up as the visitor leaves camp.  Prisoners will not deliver to or receive directly from a visitor any letter, paper, document or article.
 
 
                101.  Prisoners will enjoy freedom of religion, including attendance at services of their respective faiths held within the camp.
 
 
 
                102.  Prisoners of war who are clergymen may minister freely to prisoners who voluntarily request their ministrations.  Other duly ordained clergymen may enter camps and conduct religious services by permission of the camp commander upon the recommendation of the chaplain of the camp, or the nearest available post or camp chaplain if the camp has no chaplain.
 
 
 
 
                103.  In ministering to the spiritual welfare of the prisoners the following regulations will be observed by visiting clergymen:
 
 
 
 
                        a.  Ministers, priests, rabbis or chaplains will discuss only matters that pertain to their religious duties.
 
 
 
 
                        b.  Unless accompanied by camp officials, they will enter only chapels, offices, recreational buildings, or other buildings within the camp in which services may be held.
 
 
 
 
                        c.  They will not deliver to or receive directly from prisoners any letter, paper, document, or article.
 
 
 
 
                        d.  Clergymen may confer privately with prisoners while ministering to their spiritual welfare.
 
 
 
 
- 41 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
                104.  Commanding officers of camps to which chaplains are not regularly assigned are authorized to secure the assistance of the nearest available post or camp chaplain in providing suitable ministrations for the prisoners.
 
 
                105.  A prisoner may posses and operate a long-wave receiving set incapable of receiving short-wave radio signals.  A short-wave band is construed as the receiving of signals, messages or communications of any nature whatsoever which are transmitted by means of amplitude modulation radio waves of the frequency 1750 kilocycles or greater, or of a frequency of 540 kilocycles or less.  A long-wave radio receiving set with short-wave communications is prohibited unless the set is so altered or modified that short-wave radio communications cannot be received by the set, and further, unless the set is so altered or modified that it is impossible without the addition of more parts and the substantial rebuilding of the set to modify it so that it will be capable of receiving short-wave communications.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
- 42 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
X.  Discipline.
 
 
                106.  Prisoners are subject to the laws, regulations, and orders in force in the Army of the United States including the Articles of War.  Subject to exceptions and qualifications prescribed by law, international agreement, or by the War Department, prisoners are within the jurisdiction of courts-martial and, except for officer prisoners, are liable to summary punishment by officers of the Army of the United States.  Prisoners also are subject to the civil laws of the United States and of the state and municipality where intended.
 
 
 
                107.  All military personnel having immediate custody of prisoners will be firm and exact in enforcing military discipline and military custody.
 
 
 
 
                108.  Regulations affecting the conduct and activities of prisoners will be posted conspicuously in a sufficient number of places, in the native language of the respective prisoners.
 
 
 
 
                109.  Prisoners will not be exposed to cruel or inhuman treatment.  They will not suffer any punishment prohibited by the Geneva Convention, nor any type of punishment other than those allowed for personnel of the Army of the United States.  No collective punishment will be imposed for the misconduct of an individual.
 
 
 
 
                110.  Noncommissioned officers and other designated leaders, including officer prisoners, who fail to perform properly the duties of supervision of the men, or officers, under them, or any other duty with which they may be entrusted, will be punished as offenders
 
 
 
 
- 43 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
against good order and discipline.  Prisoners, however, may not be deprived of their respective ranks nor may noncommissioned officers be denied the prerogatives attached to their ranks.
 
                111.  Notice of cases to be tried by courts-martial will be submitted to The Provost Marshal through channels early enough so that the Protecting Power concerned may be informed in each case three weeks before trial.  A complete authenticated copy of the record of the court-martial proceedings in each case will be forwarded to The Provost Marshal General's Office.
 
 
Amended Cir. #11
                112.  Each prisoner will be responsible for government property and clothing issued to him and will be chargeable in event of its loss or damage other than reasonable wear.  Each prisoner also will be responsible for other governmental property lost or damaged because of his misconduct.  The amount of the indebtedness incurred by damage or loss of government property may be collected in monthly installments by deductions from his current allowance and compensation for work.  The aggregate sum of deductions for any month will not exceed two-thirds of the prisoner's allowance and compensation for work for that month.  If any part of a prisoner's allowance for a certain month has been forfeited by courts-martial sentence or is otherwise authorized to be withheld, no deduction will be applied which will reduce the actual allowance of the prisoner for that month below one-third of his authorized allowance.
 
 
 
 
                113.  If a prisoner attempts to escape or pass a defined limit, the sentinel or any member of the guard who sees him will shout HALT!  If the prisoner fails to halt immediately the sentinel
 
 
 
 
- 44 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
or guard will shout halt a second time and if necessary a third time.  Thereafter, if there appears to be no other effective means of preventing his escape, the sentinel or guard will fire at him.  It will be the responsibility of the camp commander to assure himself that each prisoner thoroughly understands the significance of the word halt, including that various ways it may be expressed by guards acting in emergencies.  A prisoner attempting to escape will, upon recapture, be placed under additional surveillance deemed necessary to prevent repetition of the attempt.  An organized attempt to escape will be put down by force of arms if necessary.
 
 
                114.  The Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of Justice is charged with the responsibility for coordinating the search for escaped prisoners.  Camp commanders will consult with the special agent in charge of the nearest field office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation concerning the procedure to be followed upon the escape of a prisoner including the notification of officials, civilian and military, in the vicinity of the camp and those in other localities through which an escaped prisoner will be likely to travel in effecting his escape.  Upon the escape of a prisoner, notification will be telephoned immediately by the camp commander to the field office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and to The Provost Marshal General.  Every available assistance will be given to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, including the best possible description of the escaped prisoner and any other information which may be useful in effecting his recapture.  The camp commander will notify The Provost Marshal General when an escaped
 
 
 
- 45 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
prisoner is recaptured.
 
 
XI.  Military Courtesies.
 
 
 
                115.  When the National Anthem is played or To the Colors, Escort of the Colors, or Retreat is sounded, prisoners not in buildings will stand at attention and face the music or colors.
 
 
 
 
                116.  In addition to the courtesies required by regulations in force in their own armies regarding their officers, prisoners other than officers, will salute all commissioned officers of the United States Armed Forces.  Officer prisoners are required to salute only officer of a higher or equal rank but will return all salutes.
 
 
 
 
                117.  A prisoner in a military formation will not salute unless he is in command thereof.
 
 
 
 
                118.  A prisoner out of doors upon the approach of an officer, of equal or higher rank, will face toward him, stand at attention and salute.  Prisoners at assigned work will not salute an officer unless addressed by him.
 
 
 
 
                119.  When an officer of higher or equal rank enters a room in which there are prisoners, the latter will stand at attention and uncover until the officer indicates otherwise.
 
 
 
 
                120.  When an officer of higher or equal rank enters a mess hall, unless otherwise directed, prisoners at meals will remain seated, continue eating, but will not converse.
 
 
 
 
                121.  On entering a room where an officer of higher or equal rank is present the prisoner will uncover.
 
 
 
 
                122.  Before addressing an officer of higher or equal rank,
 
 
 
 
- 46 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
a prisoner will salute.  He will salute upon the termination of the interview.
 
 
                123.  A prisoner in ranks will assume the position of attention when addressed by an officer.
 
 
 
                124.  Additional regulations not inconsistent with Army Regulations or the Geneva Convention may be issued by the camp commander.
 
 
 
 
XII.  Communications, Parcels, Books, Newspapers and Magazines.
 
 
 
 
        A.  Notification of Address.
 
 
 
 
                125.  Within a period of not more than one week after arrival at the first prisoner of war camp and in the event of sickness or transfer from one camp to another, each prisoner will dispatch a card to his home address containing his name, serial number, and the name and address of the camp.  W.D., P.M.G. Form No. 5, 6 or 7, depending upon the nationality of the prisoner, will be used for this purpose.
 
 
 
 
                126.  After arrival at the first prisoner of war camp and after any subsequent transfer, prisoners will accomplish O.C. Form No. 72 for dispatch to the District Postal Censor.
 
 
 
 
        B.  Letters and Cards.
 
 
 
 
                127.  Each General Officer prisoner may mail five letters and five post cards per month.  Other prisoners may each mail one letter and one post card per week.  The length of each letter will be restricted to one sheet comprising twenty-four lines of writing on one side only.  Legal documents, for instance wills and deeds, may be inclosed when necessary.  The length of post card messages will be restricted to
Amended Cir. #9
 
 
 
- 47 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
nine lines.  Letter by spokesmen to military or other governmental officials, to Protecting Powers or to approved relief or aid organizations will not be restricted as to length or number and will not count against the weekly mail allowance of the writer.  There is no restriction on the number or length of letters or number of cards a prisoner may receive.  Letter and cards to or from prisoners, unless sent by air mail, are postage free.
 
 
                128.  Unless otherwise authorized by The Provost Marshal General, prisoners will write all their letters on W.D., P.M.G. Form No. 4 and their weekly cards on W.D., P.M.G. Form No. 5-1, 6-1, or 7-1, depending on their nationality.  Camp commanders will be responsible for distribution of stationery, cards, and notification of address forms to the prisoners through company commanders.
 
 
 
                129.  The contents of outgoing letters and cards will be governed by the following:
 
 
 
 
                        a.  Communications, other than those to a PRotecting Power or to American military authorities, should not contain complaints.  Violation of this rule may result in excision or deletion of the complaint or condemnation of the letter by the District Postal Censor.
 
 
 
 
                        b.  Communications will not contain quotations from books or other writings.
 
 
 
 
                        c.  The use of cyphers, codes, musical symbols, shorthand, marks or signs other than normal punctuation is forbidden.
 
 
 
 
                        d.  Communications will not contain any military information or, except in letters to a Protecting Power or
 
 
 
 
- 48 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
spokesmen's letters to a relief or aid organization, any reference to numbers of prisoners.
 
 
                        e.  Communications other than those to a Protecting Power or complaints to American military authorities will not contain criticism of any governmental agency, official, circumstances of capture or of conditions or treatment of prisoners.
 
 
 
                        f.  Communications containing statements at variance with facts may be withheld of the false statements excised or deleted by the District Postal Censor.
 
 
 
 
                130.  The form of letter and cards will ne governed by the following:
 
 
 
 
                        a.  Letter and cards must be legibly addressed, written in plain language, the meaning of which is clear, and in characters sufficiently large to be easily readable.  No item of mail will be lettered or numbered to indicate that it is a part of a series.
 
 
 
 
                        b.  All correspondence must be written and addressed in dark ink or by a typewriter.
 
 
 
 
                        c.  Outgoing letters will not be sealed.
 
 
 
 
                        d.  On each card, at the top of each letterhead and on the outside of the envelope must appear a word denoting the language in which the communication is written e.g. English, German, Italian, Japanese.
 
 
 
 
                        e.  Prisoners will be requested but not required to indicate on each communication whether the writer served in the enemy Army, Navy, Air Force or the Merchant Marine at the time of
 
 
 
 
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capture.  The Letter "A" will indicate Army; "N", Navy;  "AF", Air Force, and "MM", Merchant Marine.  This symbol will follow the designation of the language in which the communication is written.
 
 
                131.  Prisoners will not correspond with stamp or souvenir collectors, or with newspapers or magazines for the purpose of having their statements published.
 
 
Substitute New Par. 132 Cir. # 11
                132.  Prisoners in one camp will not correspond with those in another unless the writer and addressee are related by family ties and such relationship is indicated in the return address of the writer.
 
 
 
 
                133.  Except for letter written by spokesmen to a Protecting Power or to a relief or aid organization, prisoners may not act generally as agents for other prisoners in writing letters or cards.  If a prisoner is unable to write through lack of education, accident, or sickness, the message may, upon permission of the camp commander, be written by another prisoner.  In these instances the communication will be countersigned by the prisoner doing the writing.
 
 
 
Amended by adding Par. 133A Cir. #3
                134.  Prisoners will not send maps, sketches, drawings, or pictures not containing photographs of themselves.  Outgoing prisoner of war mail requiring postage will have the stamps affixed to the mail item in the presence of an American officer or noncommissioned officer, who will examine each mail item and stamp to determine that no writing is concealed under the stamp.
 
 
 
 
                135.  Letters and cards received for prisoners transferred to another camp will be forwarded by the camp commander to the new
 
 
 
 
- 50 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
address.  Where the amount of this mail is sufficiently large, it will be forwarded in pouches or in penalty envelopes.  Mail which cannot be forwarded or delivered to addresses because of wrong or insufficient address, unless corrections can be made at camp, and mail for prisoners who have been repatriated, will be forwarded to the Prisoner of War Division, Provost Marshal General's Office.  Letters and cards for decedents will be returned to the writer if the writer is within the continental United States, otherwise they will be forwarded to the Prisoner of War Information Bureau.  Mail will not be returned to the writer with the remark "Not Known", "Not Here" or Not at this Camp".  Mail for decedents returned to writers in the continental United States will be marked :Deceased".
 
 
        C.  Parcels.
 
 
 
                136.  Each prisoner may mail one parcel per month to addressees in continental United States.  Postal regulations will be followed.
 
 
 
 
                137.  The content, including the kind and number of items, of domestic parcels addressed to a particular prisoner in the United States will conform to governmental regulations concerning parcels mailed to American prisoners of war interned in the enemy country which the addressee served.
 
 
 
 
                138.  Incoming and outgoing domestic parcels not exceeding four pounds are postage free.  Other parcels will be prepaid.
 
 
 
 
                139.  Parcels received for transferred prisoners will be forwarded immediately by the camp commander.  However, parcels obviously containing perishable articles which are addressed to
 
 
 
 
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transferred prisoners, prisoners who have died, escaped, or who have been repatriated, which because of their nature would be of no value if forwarded, will be distributed to the prisoner kitchen or hospital.  If these parcels contain nonperishable articles the latter will be repackaged and forwarded to the transferred addresses.  Nonperishable contents received for prisoners who have died, escaped, or who have been repatriated, may be distributed to appropriate prisoners in the same camp except in instances where the content is of a strictly personal nature or of considerable value.  Where distribution of the contents cannot be made the parcels will be returned to sender if he is within continental United States.  If no return address is available, or if the sender is outside the continental United States contents of parcels will be forwarded to the Prisoner of War Information Bureau.  Where the content of a parcel cannot be delivered to a prisoner on account of illness, distribution will be made if possible in accordance with his wishes.  The camp commander will report to the Prisoner of War Information Bureau all parcels received but not delivered to the addressees showing the name and address of the sender and of the addressee, the reason for nondelivery and the date and manner of disposition.
 
 
        D.  Form of Address.
 
 
 
                140.  All correspondence to or from a prisoner and parcels addressed to or by a prisoner will contain the prisoner's name, internment serial number and name of the camp as a part of the address or return address.  On outgoing communications this
 
 
 
 
- 52 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
information will appear on the letterhead, on the outside of the envelope, on the outside of parcels, and on all cards.  Outgoing letters will also contain at the top of the letterhead, the name and exact address of the person for whom intended.
 
 
                141.  The words "Prisoner of War Mail - Free" will appear in the upper right corner of all envelopes and cards, other than air mail, and in the upper right corner of the area of address of parcels not exceeding four pounds in weight.
 
 
 
        E.  Cables, Telegrams and Telephone Calls.
 
 
 
 
                142.  Each prisoner may send at his own expense during his internment one prepaid cable or telegram consisting of not more than fifteen words in the message proper.  In the event of an emergency, particularly death or serious illness, additional cables or telegrams may be permitted in the discretion of the camp commander.  Messages to persons within continental United States will be in the English language.  Arrangements for messages going to or through enemy or enemy occupied countries will be made with the local American Red Cross Field Director for payments and transmittal through the International Red Cross Committee, Geneva, Switzerland.  No cable or telegram will be sent to a governmental official or to a Protecting Power.
 
 
 
 
                143.  Prisoners may receive cablegrams or telegrams.
 
 
 
 
                144.  Prisoners will not make or receive telephone calls.
 
 
 
 
        F.  Red Cross Express Messages.
 
 
 
 
                145.  By agreement with Germany and Italy, prisoners who served either of these countries and who have received no mail from
 
 
 
 
- 53 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
their next of kin for three months or more may send a special "Express Message" to members of their families.  The following regulations will prevail:
 
 
                        a.  Forms for these messages will be furnished each camp commander by the International Red Cross Committee.
 
 
 
                        b.  Camp commanders will distribute and collect these forms through prisoner spokesmen.
 
 
 
 
                        c.  The camp commander's representative will place all messages in one or more envelopes, addressed to the International Red Cross Committee, Geneva, Switzerland.  Envelopes will be furnished to the camp commander by the International Red Cross Committee.  If the prisoners desire to do so they may affix the necessary trans-atlantic air mail postage to the envelope.  The postage will be paid by the prisoners.  The unsealed envelopes containing the messages will be placed in a postage free envelope addressed to the New York District Postal Censor.
 
 
 
 
                        d.  If after three months from the date of his previous express message was mailed, the prisoner has received no answer, he may send another message.
 
 
 
 
                146.  Express messages initiated by a prisoner and those in answer to incoming express messages will be in addition to a prisoner's weekly mail allowance.  Incoming express messages may be answered whenever received.
 
 
 
 
        G.  Books.
 
 
 
 
                147.  Publishers in the United States may send new books to prisoner of war camps or individual prisoners.  Organizations in
 
 
 
 
- 54 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
the United States approved by The Provost Marshal General may send new or unmarked used books to camp libraries but not to individual prisoners.  Private persons may not send any books to camps or to prisoners unless ordered from and shipped direct from the publisher.  Books intended for prisoners will not contain any writing, notation, or other marking.
 
 
                148.  Unless needed for instructional purposes and their use is recommended by the camp commander, books pertaining to the following subjects will not be made available to prisoners:
 
 
 
                        a.  Technical books, manuals and treatises containing military information including weapons and armaments, tactics, organization and logistics.
 
 
 
 
                        b.  Navigation, including charts, plans, wharf and code maps, meteorological charts and currents, sailing instructions, list of lights, list of wireless signals, tide tables, distance tables, nautical  and air almanacs, directories, calendars and information relative to ports, harbors, anchorages and inland waterways.
 
 
 
 
                        c.  Chemistry.
 
 
 
 
                        d.  Explosives.
 
 
 
 
                        e.  Wireless and radio.
 
 
 
 
                        f.  Enemy propaganda.
 
 
 
 
        H.  Newspapers and Magazines.
 
 
 
 
                149.  Except as otherwise provided in this paragraph only current newspapers and magazines of wide circulation published in the English language in continental United States will be made
 
 
 
 
- 55 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
available to prisoners.  The selection of newspapers and magazines within this category will be the responsibility of the camp commander.  Foreign language newspapers and magazines published in the United States may be made available to prisoners upon the approval of The Provost Marshal General.  If the camp commander deems it advisable, he may restrict the numbers of newspapers to one per day for each twenty prisoners or fraction thereof, and the number of magazines to one per week for each ten prisoners or fraction thereof.  Unmarked old magazines in the English language, published in continental United States and distributed by relief or aid organizations, may be received for camp libraries in the discretion of the camp commander upon censorship by him.
 
 
                150.  Prisoners will be permitted to receive newspapers or magazines from publishing concerns only.  Newspapers and magazines may be forwarded from these concerns as a result of prisoner or gift subscriptions.  All publications will be carefully examined in detail by the camp commander or his representative before delivery to prisoners.  Want ads, personal notices and other parts of any publication deemed undesirable for prisoners may be withdrawn or excised before delivery.
 
 
 
                151.  Neither newspapers nor magazines will be mailed prisoners.
 
 
 
 
XIII.  Censorship.
 
 
 
 
        A.  Letters and Cards.
 
 
 
 
                152.  Subject to the provisions of the next paragraph, outgoing letters and cards from camps in the United States will be transmitted direct from camp to the District Postal Censor,
 
 
 
 
- 56 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
252 Seventh Avenue, New York, New York for censorship.  Also subject to the next paragraph, incoming letters and cards which arrive at a camp without having been previously censored by the War Department, by the Office of Censorship or by the British Censor will also be forwarded to the District Postal Censor for censorship before delivery to addressees.
 
 
                153.  Letters and cards to Protecting Powers, to the International Red Cross Committee and to governmental officials in the continental United States, will be forwarded direct from camp to the Prisoner of War Division, Provost Marshal General's Office.  Letters and cards from these agencies and individuals will be examined by the camp commander before delivery to prisoners.  Incoming letters and cards in this class may, in instances deemed necessary by the camp commander, be forwarded to The Provost Marshal General for consideration before delivery to the addressees.  Letters referred to in this paragraph which contain inclosures, other than legal documents routed through a Protecting Power, intended for persons or organizations overseas, will be forwarded direct from camp to the District Postal Censor.
 
 
 
                154.  All prisoner of war letters and cards may be examined and read by the camp commander for information, but no marking, deletion, excision or mutilation of any part of the mail will be made at camp.  Outgoing mail containing obvious deviations from regulations will be returned to the prisoner by the camp commander
 
 
 
 
- 57 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
for correction or rewriting.  Prisoner of war mail will not be subjected to censorship or examination by spokesmen or other prisoner leaders.  The privacy of mail will be secured by the use of locked boxes or other secure means.
 
 
                155.  Outgoing letters and cards will be dispatched and incoming letters and cards will be delivered to prisoners daily.  Letters and cards which are to be forwarded to the District Postal Censor should not be held by the camp commander for more than twenty-four hours.  Outgoing mail which bears date at variance of more than forty-eight hours from the date of dispatch, when not the result of administrative delay, will be returned to the writer for rewriting with the proper date.  Prisoners will not be asked to post date latter or cards nor will the original date be changed by the prisoner or anyone at the camp.  Letters and cards will be transmitted in pouches or in government envelopes.  To the extent practicable, outgoing letters and cards will be packaged according to the language in which written and sub-packaged according to component, i.e., Army, Navy, Air Force, or Merchant Marine.
 
 
 
        B.  Parcels.
 
 
 
 
                156.  The contents of all incoming and outgoing parcels will be examined at the camp.  The opening and examination of incoming parcels will be in the presence of the addressee.  All domestic parcels other than books will be censored at the camp.  Incoming overseas parcels will be censored by the District Postal Censor.
 
 
 
 
        C.  Cables and Telegrams.
 
 
 
 
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                157.  All cables and telegrams will be censored at the camp.  Overseas cables, incoming and outgoing, will also be censored by the Office of Censorship.
 
 
        D.  Books.
 
 
 
                 158.  All books intended for individual prisoners or camp libraries will be censored by the Office of Censorship and will be forwarded to the New York District Postal Censor.
 
 
 
 
        E.  Miscellaneous.
 
 
 
 
                159.  The censorship of incoming domestic letters, cards and books, other than registered mail, will be expedited if the sender forwards them direct to the District Postal Censor rather than to a camp.  The name and return address of the sender will be placed in the upper left corner of the envelope, card or book wrapper.  The term "Prisoner of War Mail - Free" will be placed in the upper right corner.  The name and serial number of the prisoner, the name of his camp, but not the name of the state where located, and "Box 20, General Post Office, New York, New York" will be placed in the center and lower half of the envelope, card or books wrapper.  Example:
 
 
 
 
  John Doe   Prisoner of War Mail - Free
  277 Oak Street,    
  Chicago, Ill.    
       
    Richard Roe (Serial Number)
    Prisoner of War Camp, Springtown,
    (or Prisoner of War Camp, Ft. Leonard Wood),
    Box 20, General Post Office,
    New York, New York.  
 
 
 
 
                160.  Uncensored registered mail will be signed for by the camp commander or his designated representative.  Money, checks or
 
 
 
 
- 59 -
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
other items of value will be withdrawn and the letter forwarded to the District Postal Censor.  Registered mail will be forwarded in bundles labeled "Registered Mail."  Items withdrawn, if innocuous, will be given to or placed to the credit of the prisoner.  If any item is condemned or placed to credit, the prisoner involved will be informed.
 
 
                161.  Each camp commander will maintain a log for each item of registered mail or insured parcel, showing the name and address of the sender, the name and serial number of the addressee, the date of receipt of the mail, and the date and manner of disposition.
 
 
 
                162.  The contents of this chapter and of the preceding chapter will be made known to all the prisoners by publishing special notices in the language of the respective prisoners, e.g. German, Italian, Japanese.
 
 
 
 
XIV.  Complaints and Requests.
 
 
 
 
                163.  Prisoners have the right to make complaints and requests to the camp commanders and to the Protecting Powers regarding the conditions of their internment.
 
 
 
 
                164.  Any prisoner having a complaint or request may make it known to the appropriate spokesmen, who will in turn inform the company commander.  The latter will consider the case and attempt to settle it.  If the prisoner still deems himself aggrieved, he may submit a signed statement which will be transmitted by the spokesman to the company commander.  The prisoner's statement together with any information deemed necessary will be submitted to the camp commander immediately.  Reports of written complaints or requests
 
 
 
 
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and the action taken will be forwarded through channels to The Provost Marshal General.
 
 
                165.  Prisoners have the right to make complaints to the Protecting Powers regarding their treatment and conditions in camp by mail and orally through the visiting representatives of the Protecting Powers.
 
 
 
                166.  All complaints by mail to the Protecting Powers will be forwarded by the camp commanders through the Service Command to The Provost Marshal General without delay.  Complaints containing false statements will be returned by the camp commanders to the prisoners for correction.  If a prisoner does not wish to make any correction, his complaint will be submitted as above together with an accurate statement of the situation by the camp commander.
 
 
 
 
                167.  Complaints will be anticipated by camp commanders, train commanders or others having immediate custodial charge of prisoners.  A record will be made of all untoward incidents including:
 
 
 
 
                        a.  Death or injury to prisoners, whether result of violence, alterations, accidents or natural causes.
 
 
 
 
                        b.  Damage or loss of property of prisoners by fire, theft or other causes.
 
 
 
 
                        c.  Escape or attempted escape of prisoners.
 
 
 
 
                        d.  Any other incident likely to result in complaints by prisoners.
 
 
 
 
The record will be made as soon after the event as practicable for the purpose of providing accurate information.  It will include statements of eye witnesses and inventories of lost or damaged property.  A copy
 
 
 
 
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of each record will be forwarded to The Provost Marshal General.
 
 
XV.  Death and Burial.
 
 
 
                168.  Upon the death of a prisoner in the custody of the War Department, the camp medical officer will notify immediately the camp commander or the officer charged with the custody of the prisoner prior to death.  This notification will include the following information:
 
 
 
 
 
                        a.  Full name of the deceased.
 
 
 
 
                        b.  Internment serial number.
 
 
 
 
                        c.  Date, place, and cause of death.
 
 
 
 
                        d.  Whether or not death was a result of the decedent's own misconduct.
 
 
 
 
                        e.  When the cause of death is undetermined, that fact will be stated on the notification of death by the medical officer, but when finally determined by autopsy or other means, supplemental report will be made.
 
 
 
 
                169.  Upon receipt of the notification of death from the medical officer, the commanding officer immediately will inform The Provost Marshal General of the death giving full name of the decedent, internment serial number, date, place and cause of death and whether or not death was the result of the prisoner's own misconduct.  If the information required is undetermined, a supplemental report will be rendered as soon as possible.  Provisions of this chapter are applicable in the event of the death of a prisoner during transfer.
 
 
 
 
                170.  All persons who die while interned will be honorably buried.
 
 
 
 
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                171.  Prisoners will be buried in the nearest available permanent cemetery.  A record of location, plot and grave number or description will be forwarded to the Prisoner of War Information Bureau.
Substitute New Par. 171,       Cir. # 11
 
 
                172.  The desires of prisoners concerning funeral services may be followed, if practicable, when services are held at a camp.  A small group of prisoners may be permitted by the camp commander to accompany the body to the grave if the cemetery is in the vicinity of the camp.
 
 
 
                173.  The following military honors may be extended to deceased prisoners of war:
Substitute New Par. 173A     Cir. #11
 
 
                        a.  During the funeral service, the casket may be draped with the decedent's national flag if available and desired by the prisoners.  Prisoners will be responsible for procuring their national flag.  This flag will remain in the custody of the camp commander to be used when prescribed by him.
 
 
 
                        b.  Three volleys may be fired over the open grave by a squad of Military Police Escort Guards and taps may be sounded if desired by the prisoners.
 
 
 
 
                174.  The identification tag issued to the prisoner by the country he served will be interred with the body.  A duplicate tag will be forwarded to the Prisoner of War Information Bureau.  In the absence of any identification tag, a metal tag in duplicate similar to the identification tag issued to United States troops will be substituted.  The substituted tag will contain the decedent's name, his military serial number, and if available the name and
 
 
 
 
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address of the next of kin.
 
Amends Cir. #2 New Par. "Temporary Markers"
                175.  Graves will be identified with a marker in accordance with Section 3, paragraph 50, National Cemetery Regulations.  "Organization" will include designation whether German, Italian, or Japanese.
 
                176.  After burial, W.D., Q.M.C. Form No. 14 will be completed in triplicate.  Under "Remarks", the designation whether German, Italian or Japanese will be inserted.  The original and first duplicate will be transmitted to Memorial Branch, Office of the Quartermaster General, Washington 25, D. C., and the second duplicate retained by the camp commander.
 
 
 
 
                177.  Burial expenses will be paid in accordance with regulations governing the burial of enlisted men of the Army of the United States.
 
 
 
Substitute New Par. 78 Cir. #11
                178.  Inventory of personal effects, except clothing, and W.D., A.G.O. Form No. 52 will be completed in triplicate and forwarded to The Provost Marshal General.  In the completion of W.D., A.G.O. Form No. 52, the internment serial number will be used in place of "Army Serial Number", and camp and company in place of "Grade" and "Organization or Army or Service".  The words "in line of duty" will be deleted.  The reverse side of the form will not be completed.  The personal effects of the decedent, other than clothing, will be packaged and stored by the camp commander pending instructions for disposition from The Provost Marshal General.
 
 
 
 
                179.  Notices of deaths to the Department of State and the Protecting Powers will issue from the Office of The Provost Marshal General.
 
 
 
 
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                180.  Reports to civil health authorities and to the Bureau of Census will be submitted in accordance with and under the conditions prescribed in paragraph 6 and 7 of AR 40-1080, 31 December 1934.
 
 
                181.  If death of a prisoner is the result of an attempt to escape, foul play, or suspected foul play, violence, or unnatural causes, including suicide, or if death is sudden from unknown causes, an investigating officer will be appointed to investigate and report in accordance with all applicable provisions of paragraph 18 of AR 600-550, 14 May 1943 as amended.  One copy of the findings of the investigating officer will be forwarded direct to The Provost Marshal General.  Three copies of the report of the summary court appointed in accordance with paragraph 19 of AR 600-550, 14 May 1943, will be forwarded to The Provost Marshal General.
 
 
 
                182.  Commanding Generals of Theaters of Operations will make reports to the Prisoner of War Information Bureau, Provost Marshal General's Office, of all enemies who have died on the battlefield.  These reports will include the name, serial number, organization, and inventory of personal effects, except clothing, of each decedent, together with full particulars as to the place of burial.  The personal effects of the decedents, other than clothing, will be packaged and stored by the Quartermaster pending instructions for disposition from The Provost Marshal General.
 
 
 
 
BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:
 
 
 
 
                                                                                      G.  C.  MARSHAL
 
 
                                                                                                Chief of Staff.
 
 
 
 
 
 
OFFICIAL:
 
 
        J. A. ULIO,
 
 
                Major General,
 
 
                        The Adjutant General.
 
 
 
 
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