COPY No.
     
 
This book is invariably to be kept locked up when not in use and is not to be taken outside the ship or establishment for which it it issued without the express permission of the Commanding Officer
 
     
     
     
 
C.B.  04051 (100)
 
   
     
 
 
 
U.257, U.91, U.358 & U.744
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interrogation of Survivors
 
 
 
     
     
     
     
 
 
     
 
June, 1944
 
 
 
 
 
     
     
     
 
This Report is not to be considered accurate in all respects, having been prepared before complete information was available.  It is therefore not to be taken as historically correct.
 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

 

 
 

   
 
     
     
     
     
     
     
   
     
     
     
     
 
SECRET
 
     
          This book is the property of His Majesty's Government.  
     
          It is intended for the use of the recipients only, and for communication to such Officers under them (not below the rank of Commissioned Officer) who may require to be acquainted with its contents in the course of their duties.  The Officers exercising this power will be held responsible that such information is imparted with due care and caution.  
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
 
 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

 

 

     
 
SECRET
 
     
 
Attention is called to the penalties attaching to any infraction of the
 
Official Secrets Acts
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
 
C.B.  04051 (100)
 
     
     
 
 
 
U.257, U.91, U.358 & U.744
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interrogation of Survivors
 
 
 
     
     
     
     
 
 
     
 
June, 1944
 
 
 
 
 
     
     
     
 
     
     
     
     
  NAVAL INTELLIGENCE DIVISION,  
  ADMIRALTY, S.W.1.  
     
  N.I.D. 03050/44.  
                                                                                                                                             A  
     
     

 

     
     
 
ii
   
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
          The following report is compiled from information derived from prisoners of war.  The statements made cannot always be verified; they should therefore not be accepted as facts unless they are definitely stated to be confirmed by information from other sources.  
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

 

     
 
iii
 
     
     
 
CONTENTS
 
_______
 
 
 
         
PAGE
PART I.
  INTRODUCTION  
1
         
PART II.
  DETAILS OF U.257, U.91, U. 358 and U.744  
2
 
(i)
  Sinking  
 
(ii)
  Tonnage  
 
(iii)
  Type  
 
(iv)
  Builders  
 
(v)
  Commissioned  
 
(vi)
  Guns  
 
(vii)
  Torpedoes on last patrol  
 
(viii)
  Diesels  
 
(ix)
  Main Motors  
 
(x)
  W/T Equipment  
 
(xi)
  G.S.R.  
 
(xii)
  R.D.B.  
 
(xiii)
  Radar Decoy Spar-Buoy (R.D.S.)  
 
(xiv)
  Contact Keeping Buoys  
 
(xv)
  U/T  
 
(xvi)
  Mine Ejection Gear  
 
(xvii)
  Bathythermometer  
 
(xviii)
  Rubber Dinghies  
 
(xix)
  Badge  
 
(xx)
  Flotilla  
 
(xxi)
  Field Post Number  
 
(xxii)
  Cover Name  
 
     
PART III.
 
U.257.
 
3
 
I.
  Introductory Remarks  
 
          (i)  General  
 
         (ii)  Commanding Officer  
 
        (iii)  Sole Surviving Officer  
 
II.
  Fifth and Last Patrol of U.257  
 
          (i)  Preparations for Patrol  
 
         (ii)  U.257 sails  
 
        (iii)  Special Mission  
 
        (iv)  Sighting of a Convoy  
 
         (v)  Sighting of a Frigate  
 
        (vi)  Contact with a Convoy  
 
III.
  Sinking of U.257.  
4
 
          (i)  First Attacks  
 
         (ii)  Final Attack  
 
Appendix "A"  Building and Working up of U.257
 
 
Appendix "B"  Previous Patrols of U.257
 
 
          (i)  First Patrol  
 
         (ii)  Second Patrol  
 
        (iii)  Third Patrol  
 
        (iv)  Fourth Patrol  
 
Appendix "C"  Nominal Roll of U.257
 
5
 
     
PART IV.
 
U.91
 
6
 
I.
  Introductory Remarks  
 
          (i)  General  
               (ii)  Commanding Officer    
              (iii)  Other Surviving Officers    
              (iv)  Ratings    
 
     
                                                                                                                                       B  
     
     

 

     
 
iv
 
 
 
 
         
PAGE
 
II.
  Sixth and Last Patrol of U.91  
6
 
          (i)  U.91 sails  
 
         (ii)  Passage of the Bay of Biscay  
 
        (iii)  Formation of a Patrol Line  
 
        (iv)  A convoy sighting  
 
III.
  Sinking of U.91.  
7
 
          (i)  First Attack  
 
         (ii)  Subsequent attacks  
 
Appendix "A"  Building and Working up of U.91
 
 
Appendix "B"  Previous Patrols of U.91
 
 
          (i)  First Patrol  
 
         (ii)  Second Patrol  
 
        (iii)  Third Patrol  
 
        (iv)  Fourth Patrol  
               (v)  Fifth Patrol    
 
Appendix "C"  Nominal Roll of U.91
 
9
 
     
PART V.
 
U.358
 
10
 
I.
  Introductory Remarks  
 
          (i)  General  
   
         (ii)  Complement  
   
II.
  Fifth and Last Patrol of U.358  
   
          (i)  U.358 sails  
   
          (ii)  The Patrol  
   
III.
  Sinking of U.358  
   
          (i)  First Attack  
   
         (ii)  Subsequent Attacks  
 
Appendix "A"  Building and Working up of U.358
 
11
 
Appendix "B"  Previous Patrols of U.358
 
 
          (i)  First Patrol  
 
         (ii)  Second Patrol  
 
        (iii)  Third Patrol  
 
        (iv)  Fourth Patrol  
 
Appendix "C"  Nominal Roll of U.358
 
12
   
     
PART VI.  
U.744
 
13
   
I.
  Introductory Remarks  
   
          (i)  General  
   
         (ii)  Complement  
   
II.
  Second and Last Patrol of U.744  
 
          (i)  False Starts  
 
         (ii)  Final Sailing  
 
        (iii)  Aircraft Attack  
 
        (iv)  Attack on a Convoy  
 
         (v)  Special Operation  
 
        (vi)  Attack on a Destroyer  
   
III.
  Sinking of U.744  
14
 
          (i)  U.744 is attacked  
 
         (ii)  Damage inflicted  
 
        (iii)  U-Boat surfaces  
 
Appendix "A"  Building and Working up of U.744
 
15
 
Appendix "B"  First Patrol of U.744
 
15
 
Appendix "C"  Translation of Captured Documents
 
15
 
          (i)  Document on torpedoes captured from U.744  
 
         (ii)  Flak Guns  
16
 
Appendix "D"  Nominal Roll of U.744
 
17
 
     
     

 

     
 
v
 
 
 
 
         
PAGE
PART VII.
  GENERAL  
18
 
I.
  General Remarks on U-Boats  
 
          (i)  Radar Decoy Spar Buoys (R.D.S.)  
 
         (ii)  G.S.R.  
 
        (iii)  New Type R.D.B.  
 
        (iv)  Walter Boats. . .  
               (v)  Small U-Boats  
19
              (vi)  VII C 42 U-Boats  
             (vii)  VII D U-Boats  
             (viii)  VII F U-Boats  
               (ix)  Flak U-Boats  
               (x)  New Type Main Motors  
              (xi)  "Max" Lifesaving Float"  
              (xii)  New Type Extensible Air Intake  
             (xiii)  Torpedoes  
20
                        (a)  T 5 (Gnat)  
                        (b)  Pi 4 Pistols  
                        (c)  T 6 Torpedoes  
                        (d)  "Lut" Mechanism ("Lut" I and "Lut" II)  
                        (e)  Steel Torpedo Tubes  
             (xiv)  Contact Keeping Buoys (FüBo)  
              (xv)  Bathythermometer  
             (xvi)  Infra Red Precautions  
21
            (xvii)  37 mm. Automatic Guns  
           (xviii)  Minefields  
            (xix)  U-Boat Tactics  
             (xx)  Bridge Armour  
            (xxi)  U-Boat Personnel  
           (xxii)  Invasion Plans  
   
    (xxiii)  Japanese Activities  
   
II.
  U-Boat Building Yards and Bases  
22
 
          (i)  Brest  
 
         (ii)  Danzig  
 
        (iii)  Flensburg  
 
        (iv)  Hel  
               (v)  Kiel  
              (vi)  Lorient  
             (vii)  Memel  
             (viii)  Vegesack  
   
     
   
PLATE:  Typical Torpedo Attacks from a U-Boat using Electric Torpedoes fitted with "Fat" and "Lut" mechanisms. . .Facing page
 
20
   
     
   
     
   
     
   
     
   
     
   
     
   
     
 
     
     

 

 
 
 
1
 
     
  REPORT ON THE INTERROGATION OF SURVIVORS FROM
  U.257, U.91, U.358 AND U.744, 500-TON U-BOATS, SUNK IN  
 
THE ATLANTIC IN FEBRUARY AND MARCH, 1944
 
  __________________________________________________________________________  
     
 
PART I  INTRODUCTION
 
     
          The four U-Boats discussed in this report were all sunk in the Atlantic; they were all 500-ton, type VII C boats.  
          U.257 was sunk on 24th February, 1944, in position 47°19'N., 26°00'W., by H.M.C.S. "WASKESIU" while on her fifth patrol.  There were nineteen survivors including one officer.  Her Commanding Officer, Kapitänleutnant HEINZ RAHE, went down with the boat.  
          U.91, whilst on her sixth patrol, was next to be sunk.  Ships in Escort Group 1 made the kill on 26th February, 1944, in position 49°45'N., 26°20'W.  The sixteen survivors included her commanding officer, Kapitänleutnant HEINZ HUNGERSHAUSEN.  
          Only one rating survived the sinking of U.358, also sunk by Escort Group 1.  This took place on 1st March, 1944, in position 45°47'N., 23°17'W. after a depth charge attack of over thirty hours.  She was sunk on her fifth patrol, whilst commanded by Kapitänleutnant ROLF MANKE.  
          U.744 was also subjected to a relentless depth charge attack.  She was sunk by ships in Escort Group C.2 on 6th March in position 52°01N., 22°37'W. on her second patrol.  There were forty survivors.  Her Commanding Officer, Oberleutnant zur See HEINZ BLISCHKE was killed by gunfire at the time of the sinking.  
          Features of this report are:  
                  (i)  Details of Radar Decoy Spar Buoy.  
                 (ii)  Details of new types of U-Boats.  
                (iii)  New types of torpedoes and settings.  
                                See Part VII, Section I.)  
          The following are the Royal Navy equivalents to German Naval ranks used in this report:  
 
Korvettenkapitän
-
Lieutenant-Commander.
Kapitänleutnant
-
Lieutenant.
Oberleutnant zur See
-
Sub-Lieutenant.
Leutnant zur See
-
Junior Sub-Lieutenant.
Oberfähnrich zur See
-
Senior Midshipman.
Fähnrich zur See
-
Junior Midshipman.
Marinestabsarzt
-
Surgeon-Lieutenant.
 
          The suffix "(Ing.)" after a rank in place of "zur See" denotes an Engineer Officer.  The suffix "der Reserve" denotes a Reserve Officer.  
     
                                                                                                                                            C  
     
     

 

 
 
 
2
 
     
 
PART II  DETAILS
 
     
 
U-257
U-91
U-358
U-744
(i)
SINKING 24.2.44 in 47°19'N., 26°00'W. 26.3.44 in 49°45'N., 26°20'W. 1.3.44 in 43°47N., 23°17'W. 6.3.44 in 52°01N., 22°37'W.
(ii)
TONNAGE 500 tons 500 tons 500 tons 500 tons
(iii)
TYPE VII C VII C VII C VII C
(iv)
BUILDERS Vulkan, Vegesack Flenderwerks, Lubeck Flensburger Schiffs-bau, Flensburg Schichauwerft, Danzig
(v)
COMMISSIONED 14.1.42 28.1.42 15.8.42 5.6.43
(vi)
GUNS 2 twin 20 mm. (.79") mountings on upper bandstand, 1 automatic 37 mm. (1.46") gun on lower band-stand, 2 light M.G.'s in reserve for mounting on bridge 2 twin 20 mm. mountings on upper band-stand, 1 automatic    37 mm. on lower bandstand, 2 type 81 M.G.'s on bridge.  A.P. and tracer ammunition carried for both 20 mm. and     37 mm. guns 2 twin 20 mm. type   C 38 mountings on upper bandstand, 1 automatic 27 mm,   gun on lower band-stand, 2 demountable type 15 M.G.'s on bridge 2 twin 20 mm. mountings on upper band-stand, 1 automatic 37 mm. gun on lower bandstand.  2 M.G.'s type 81 on bridge.  150 to 200 magazines of 37 mm. ammunition carried
(vii)
TORPEDOES ON LAST PATROL 11.  Unspecified num-ber of Gnats 11.  5 Gnats 11.  Unspecified num-ber of Gnats 10.  Four Gnats.  Pi4B pistols used for Gnats.  Pi 1, 2 and 3 pistols carried for other types
(viii)
DIESELS G.W. G.W. Called "Wotan" and "Thor" M.A.N. G.W. with Rootes type superchargers
(ix)
MAIN MOTORS A.E.G. B.B.C. B.B.C. A.E.G.
(x)
W/T EQUIPMENT Standard.  One auxili-ary D/F set for inter-cepting enemy R/T traffic said carried and known as "Presskohler Grenzwellen."  Never used.

200 watt Telefunken short wave transmitter.             150 watt Telefunken long wave transmitter.              40 watt Lorenz auxiliary transmitter.  Lo K 6 short wave receiver.                  All wave receiver.       No "Main" and no broadcast receiver carried.

Unknown Standard, including "Main" receiver.         V.H./F R/T fitted for tactical exercises only, Lo 10 U.K. 39
(xi)
G.S.R. Naxos, Wanz II and Borkum.  At Com-missioning fitted with Metox R.600 which was later replaced by Wanz I. Wanz II and Naxos.  New type Naxos aerial carried (see Part VII, Section I (ii) ). Naxos, Wanz II and Borkum. Wanz II, Naxos and Borkum.  Special Naxos testing gear carried, known as "Puck."  (See Part VII, Section I (ii) ).
(xii)
R.D.B. Carried.  Two hydrogen bottles fitted. Carried Carried but never  used Carried.  Said to be a new type.  (See Part VII, Section I (iii) ).  Six hydrogen bottles fitted.
(xiii)
Radar Decoy Spar-Buoy (R.D.S.) See Part VII, Section I (i) ) Not carried 16 carried Not carried 20 carried
(xiv)
Contact Keeping Buoys Not carried Not carried Unknown 15 or 16 carried
(xv)
U/T Carried and used on penultimate patrol Not carried Not carried Not carried
(xvi)
Mine Ejection Gear Not fitted Not fitted Not fitted Originally fitted but removed during final overhaul, H.P. air bottle group retained.
(xvii)
Bathythermometer Not known Not known Not known Carried (See Part VII Section I (xvi) )
(xviii)
Rubber Dinghies Carried Thirty 1-man, one   12-men and "Max Escape Buoy" carried (See Part VII, Section ( (xi) ) About thirty 1-man and several large dinghies carried 1-man dinghies for each man and two 7-men dinghies carried
(xix)
Badge None White horse.  Flotilla badge blue sawfish "Moritzkoph," a comic head on both sides of C/T Shield with black axe on yellow ground; and coat of arms of Posen.  Flotilla badge blue sawfish
(xx)
Flotilla 3rd at La Pallice; attached 2nd at Lorient just prior to last patrol 9th at Brest 7th at St. Nazaire 9th at Brest
(xxi)
Field Post Number M.23394 M.08626 M.50646 M.51807
(xxii)
Cover Name None Not known MORITZ Not known
     
     

 

 
 
 
3
 
     
 
PART III  U.257
     
 
I.  INTRODUCTORY REMARKS
 
     
  (i)  General  
          U.257, a 500 ton U-Boat, commanded by Kapitänleutnant HEINZ RAHE, was sunk on 24th February, 1944, by H.M.C.S. "WASKESIU" in position 47°19'N., 26°00'W.  There were nineteen survivors including one officer.  
          The U-Boat was sunk on her fifth patrol.  Four of her patrols had been in the North Atlantic and one in the Gulf of Guinea.  No success had ever been scored and there is reason to believe that no torpedoes were ever fired on patrol.  The survivors had been newly drilled in security and, in spite of the fact that they had no reason to be proud of the performance of their boat, their morale was fairly high.  
     
  (ii)  Commanding Officer  
          Kapitänleutnant HEINZ RAHE of the 1935 term went down with his boat.  He seems to have been a rather colourless figure and it was difficult to get an impression of him from the survivors.  They said he was not over strict with his men and, indeed never concerned himself very much with their welfare.  They charitably attributed his lack of success as a commanding officer to bad luck.  
     
  (iii)  Sole Surviving Officer  
          Leutnant zur See d.R. WALDEMAR NICKEL was the only officer who survived.  This twenty-year old Nazi was arrogant and security conscious.  He joined the U-Boat shortly before she sailed on her last patrol and was in charge of the flak guns.  
 
 
II.  FIFTH AND LAST PATROL OF U.257
 
     
  (i)  Preparations for Patrol  
          After her penultimate patrol, U.257 lay for some time in Lorient, where the second bandstand was added and the new 37 mm. (1.45 in.) gun was mounted.  A number of the seamen were sent to Mimizan for special training on the 37 mm. gun.  Early in December she sailed to St. Nazaire, the passage taking two days.  There she made final preparations for her next patrol, which according to one prisoner was scheduled to begin on 22 December, 1943.  During the routine diving trials, a number of minor defects developed, causing the postponement of her departure.  One of these trials took place on 29th December, when U.257 accompanied U.386 to the 200 metre (100 fms.) line.  
     
  (ii)  U.257 sails  
          U.257 sailed from St. Nazaire at 1500 on 2nd January, 1944.  Her escort as far as the 100 fathom line consisted of a Sperrbrecher and two M-class minesweepers.  The U-Boat remained surfaced until dawn, 3rd January, when she submerged for the first time.  She passed through the Bay of Biscay on a course of 270°, proceeding submerged most of the time.  
     
  (iii)  Special Mission  
          Several of the prisoners stated that the U-Boat carried certain charts and plans which she was to deliver to a blockade runner.  The vessel in question had been sunk, however, and the rendezvous never took place.  
     
  (iv)  Sighting of a Convoy  
          On about 20th January an east-bound convoy was sighted.  Course was altered to the north-west and U.257 followed the convoy for about half the day without being able to overhaul it.  The pursuit was then abandoned and course was again altered to south-west.  
     
  (v)  Sighting of a Frigate  
          On about 12th February, while proceeding at periscope depth, a frigate was sighted.  The U-Boat manoeuvered to attack but was unable to do so.  
          About a week later, U.257 received a signal from Control giving the position of various U-Boats at sea and the estimated position of a convoy.  The signal stated that the U-Boats should expect assistance from units of the German Air Force.  U.257, however, never received specific orders to join in a group operation and never made contact with any aircraft.  
     
  (vi)  Contact with a Convoy  
          At about 2300 on 23rd February U.257 was on course 090, homeward bound.  RAHE believed that there was a convoy some distance to the north but he did not think it was possible that any Allied surface units were in the immediate vicinity.  Suddenly a G.S.R. warning was received on the Naxos and the U-Boat dived.  Shortly thereafter, screw noises were heard and it was feared that an attack might develop.  
     
     

 

 
 
 
4
 
     
 
III.  SINKING OF U.257
     
  (i)  First Attacks  
          When screw noises were heard, U.257 turned on a reciprocal course in an attempt at evasion.  At about 0100 on 24th February a group of depth charges fell fairly close but no damage resulted.  The U-Boat dived deeper and at about 0200 more depth charges fell, damaging the depth gauges.  
          The screw noises were then heard fading and, some time later, RAHE decided to surface.  Before he could do so, H.E. from surface craft was again heard.  
          (N.I.D. Note.  At 0135 on 24th February H.M.C.S. "WASKESIU" obtained firm contact in position 47°16'N., 26°13'W.  A hedgehog attack was made with negative results.  H.M.C.S. "WASKESIU" then came about and dropped one Mark VII depth charge set at 350 feet.  She subsequently dropped two patterns of ten depth charges after which contact was lost.)  
     
  (ii)  Final Attack  
          At about 0600 a pattern of depth charges fell close to the U-Boat.  The main motors were damaged and water entered through the out-board vents in the Control Room and the Diesel Room.  RAHE ordered the U-Boat to surface and abandon ship.  As U.257 broke surface she was engaged with gunfire and several hits were scored.  The rudder of the U-Boat was left amidships and the Diesels were put full ahead as the crew leapt over the side.  RAHE deliberately went down with his boat.  His last act was to throw his life jacket and dinghy to the men in the water.  One of the survivors is convinced that he shot himself.  
          (N.I.D. Note.  At 0550 "WASKESIU" dropped ten Mk. VII depth charges set to 350/500 ft.  At 0559 the U-Boat surfaced and was engaged with gunfire.  Several hits were observed.  The U-Boat sank in position 47°19'N., 26°00'W.  One officer and eighteen ratings were picked up.  
     
 
APPENDIX "A"
 
 
 
BUILDING AND WORKING UP OF U.257
     
          U.257 was commissioned on 14th January, 1942, and the Vulkan yard, Vegesack.  Her trials at Kiel and in the Baltic were normal.  In May she put into Danzig for final overhaul.  After this was complete, the tactical exercises were held.  These had been postponed because of the large number of boats waiting to carry out their exercises.  Upon completing the tactical exercises, the U-Boat proceeded to Kiel to embark stores for her first patrol.  
     
 
APPENDIX "B"
 
 
 
 
PREVIOUS PATROLS OF U.257
 
     
  (i)  First Patrol  
          U.257 sailed from Kiel early in September, 1942.  She put in at Kristiansand S. and then proceeded through the Rosengarten.  When she reached her operational area in the North Atlantic, she sighted a convoy.  Just as she was attempting to get into position to attack, a Sunderland appeared and dropped several bombs.  The force of the explosions damaged one of the clutches and the U-Boat was forced to cut short her patrol.  She made for base at slow speed.  On about 12/13th October, while passing through the Bay of Biscay, she was sighted by an enemy destroyer, which closed to attack.  The U-Boat dived and used her S.B.T.  Several depth charges were dropped but no damage was inflicted.  She arrived at La Pallice on about 18th October and joined the 3rd Flotilla.  
     
  (ii)  Second Patrol  
          The second patrol was uneventful.  U.257 sailed from La Pallice shortly before Christmas, 1942.  She operated in the North Atlantic and sighted several convoys without being able to attack.  She returned to La Pallice in mid-February, 1943.  
     
  (iii)  Third Patrol  
          The third patrol was much like the second.  The U-Boat sailed from La Pallice at the end of March, 1943.  On the passage outwards through the Bay of Biscay, she was attacked by surface craft but managed to escape unharmed by using the S.B.T.  She again operated in the North Atlantic and made no attack.  The patrol ended at La Pallice early in May, 1943.  
     
  (iv)  Fourth Patrol  
          U.257 sailed from La Pallice in mid-June with the U-Boats commanded by ZURMUHLEN and KAPITSKY.  While passing through the Bay of Biscay, the three U-Boats were attacked by several aircraft.  The boats remained surfaced for some time, attempting to fight off the aircraft, and succeeded in shooting down one of them.  Only after several casualties were sustained did they dive.  One man in U.257 was killed.  (N.I.D. Note.  ZURMUHLEN commanded U.600 and KAPITZKY U.615.  The latter was sunk in the Caribbean on 7th August, 1943.  From interrogation of prisoners from U.615 it is known that the three boats sailed from La Pallice on 12th June, 1943.)  
          U.257 then proceeded to her operational area in the Gulf of Guinea.  When she was south of the Azores she refuelled from a supply U-Boat commanded by METZ.  
          (N.I.D. Note.  The supply U-boat, U.487, commanded by Oberleutnant d. R. HELMUT METZ, was sunk on 13th July, 1943.)  Much of the passage was made submerged.  Her operational area was described as that enclosed within the positions 04°N, 20°W.; 05°S., 20°W.; 05°S., 00°; and 04°N., 00°.  She spent about four weeks there without sighting any enemy shipping, although several neutral ships were reported.  
          While returning to her base, U.257 was again refuelled, this time by a 1,200 ton U-Boat commanded by KUPPISCH.  The prisoners stated that the latter boat was sunk a few days after the rendezvous.  (N.I.D. Note.  It is believed that Kapitänleutnant HERBERT KUPPISCH commanded U.847 at that time.)  
          U.257 arrived at Lorient about 10th September, 1943 and was temporarily attached to the 2nd Flotilla.  In Lorient the second bandstand was added and the twin 20 mm. (0.79 in.) and 36 mm. (1.46 in.) guns were mounted.  
     
     

 

 
 
 
5
 
     
 
APPENDIX "C"
 
 
 
NOMINAL ROLL OF U.257
 
     
 
(i)  Survivors:
 
 
 
 
Name.
Rank.
English Equivalent.
Born.
NICKEL, Waldemar Leutnant zur See der Reserve Junior Sub-Lieutenant (Naval Reserve)
8.8.23
KATTELMANN, Theo Stabsobermaschinist Staff Chief Stoker and Chief E.R.A. 1st or 2nd Class.
4.12.13
SOMMER, Fritz Obermaschinist Chief Stoker and Chief E.R.A. 1st or 2nd Class
8.11.13
REEGER, Erich Oberbootsmannsmaat Acting P.O. (Seaman's Branch)
8.9.19
SCHUBERT, Helmut Obermaschinenmaat Acting Stoker P.O. and E.R.A., 4th Class
25.11.17
KRUG, Herbert Oberfunkmaat Acting P.O. Telegraphist
2.10.19
EBERLEIN, Franz Obersanitatsmaat Acting Sick Berth P.O.
22.8.20
SCHRODER, Herbert Matrosenobergefreiter Able Seaman
19.4.24
PALM, Klaus
do.
do.
7.1.21
SIEKMANN, Willi Matrosengefreiter
do.
27.1.24
NEHRKORN, Egon
do.
do
22.5.24
RIEWE, Wilhelm
do.
do
13.5.24
STREMPEL, Heinz Maschinenobergefreiter Stoker, 1st Class
7.3.21
JUNGNITSCH, Bernard
do.
do
30.7.23
DIELAS, Erwin
do.
do
1.4.21
LENK, Helmut
do.
do
20.2.22
PLATE, Rudi Funkobergefreiter Telegraphist
4.11.22
CREMER, Otto Mechanikerobergefreiter Able Seaman (S.T.)
20.3.21
SCHRODER, Rolf Matrose IV Ordinary Signalman
4.7.21
 
 
 
 
Officers . .
1
Chief and Petty Officers . .
6
Men . .
12
   
19
 
     
  (ii)  Casualties:  
 
Name.
Rank.
English Equivalent.
RAHE, Heinz Kapitänleutnant Lieutenant
LIEDTKE, Karl Oberleutnant zur See Sub-Lieutenant
KLEMKE, Paul Leutnant zur See Junior Sub-Lieutenant
HOHNE, Reinar Oberleutnant (Ing.) Sub-Lieutenant (E)
WEICHMANN, Karl Obersteuermann C.P.O. (Navigation)
WENZEL, Karl Oberbootsmannsmaat Acting P.O. (Seaman's Branch)
HOLZTRATTNER, Karl
do.
do.
RAUH, Johann Obermaschinenmaat
Acting Stoker P.O. and E.R.A. 4th Cl.
KLOSTER, Rudolf
do.
do.
DALHOFF, Friedrich Obermaschinenmaat
do.
FLECK, Hermann Oberfunkmaat Acting P.O. Telegraphist
MENZEL, Helmut Obermechanikersmaat Acting P.O. (Leading Torpedoman)
HOCKER, Hans Maschinenmaat Leading Stoker and E.R.A., 5th Class
FISCHER, Josef
do.
do.
GRYS, Erwin Matrosenobergefreiter Able Seaman
KUNZE, Werner
do.
do.
RINGELSIEP, Gerhard
do.
do.
SINGER, Heinz
do.
do.
TEIGELER, Franz
do.
do.
WERNER, Heinz
do.
do.
ARHELGER, Karl Maschinenobergefreiter Stoker, 1st Class
HUFNAGEL, Karl Heinz
do.
do.
MARTIN, Georg
do.
do.
BANCK, Heinz
do.
do.
SUCHLAND, Kurt
do.
do.
HOHNE, Hans Maschinengefreiter
do.
KODITZ, Wolfgang
do.
do.
KOCK, (?) Matrose II Stoker, 2nd Class
SAFFER, Georg Mechanikerobergefreiter Able Seaman (S.T.)
BUTTNER, Gerhard
do.
do.
 
     
Officers . .
4
Chief and Petty Officers . .
8
Men . .
18
   
30
     
  (iii)  Total Crew:  
     
 
Officers . .
5
Chief and Petty Officers . .
14
Men . .
30
   
49
 
     
                                                                                                                                         D  
     
     

 

 
 
 
6
 
     
 
PART IV  U.91
     
 
I.  INTRODUCTORY REMARKS
 
     
  (i)  General  
          U.91, commanded by Kapitänleutnant HEINZ HUNGERSHAUSEN, was sunk by ships of E.G.1 on 26th February, 1944, in position 49°45'N., 26°20'W. while on her sixth patrol.  Sixteen of her ship's company of fifty-two survived.  All patrols had been in the North Atlantic except one, which was off the coast of Africa.  The success claimed by the U-Boat was moderate.  Five merchantmen totalling 36,000 tons and two destroyers were said to have been sunk.  The first three patrols were made under command of Kapitänleutnant HIENZ WALKERLING of the 1935 term; the last three were under HUNGERSHAUSEN, who survived the sinking.  
     
  (ii)  Commanding Officer  
          Kapitänleutnant HEINZ HUNGERSHAUSEN, twenty-seven years of age, is a native of Marburg.  His brother, WALTER, also commanded a U-Boat which has been sunk.  HUNGERSHAUSEN had been in minesweepers and before joining U.91 he served in U.128 until January, 1943.  
          He impressed his interrogators rather favorably as a man of some education and considerable personal charm.  His mind, however, had succumbed to Nazi doctrines and through consequent lack of use, had become vague and unreliable.  He was well liked by his men, although some of them criticized him as lacking in aggression and being much to cautions to be a successful U-Boat commander.  He stated that he disliked the U-Boat Arm, and preferred serving in surface ships.  
     
  (iii)  Other Surviving Officers  
          The First Lieutenant, Leutnant z. See KARL HEINZ NARJES of the May, 1941, term, and the Medical Officer, Marineoberstabsarzt ERICH SEEBACHER, were the only other surviving officers.  NARJES was an arrogant Nazi and was extremely secure.  He had joined U.91 shortly before her last patrol and had never served in any other U-Boat.  SEEBACHER was not interrogated.  
 
  (iv)  Ratings  
          The ratings who survived were rather more security conscious than prisoners from other U-Boats recently encountered.  This may have been due to the fact that after capture, their captain twice had opportunities to speak with them and warn then against interrogation.  
     
 
II.  SIXTH AND LAST PATROL OF U.91
 
     
  (i)  U.91 Sails  
          U.91 was to have sailed from Brest on 19th January, 1944.  Due to transportation difficulties, however, her new 37 mm. gun failed to reach her on time and the sailing was postponed.  When the gun finally appeared, the crew were dismayed to find that it was in a dismantles condition.  No one in U.91 had had any training in this type of weapon and, consequently, it took two days to assemble it.  It was then fired and promptly jammed, causing further delay.  
          At 1500 on 25th January, U.91 sailed, accompanied by U.256 commanded by BRAUEL and the U-Boat commanded by BARLBEN.  U.413 was also to have sailed with them, but failed to put in an appearance.  The three U-Boats were escorted to the 100 fathom line by minesweepers.  
     
  (ii)  Passage of the Bay of Biscay  
          While passing through the Bay of Biscay, several G.S.R. warnings were received.  After each one, ten to twenty R.D.B.'s were released and the U-Boat dived.  A telegraphist who was in charge of the balloons estimated that a total of about 120 were released.  In spite of the delay in sailing, dock repairs had been hastily and carelessly completed and after being at sea for about fourteen days, one of the main motor bearings overheated.  Adjustments were made while submerged.  
     
  (iii)  Formation of a Patrol Line  
          U.91 had received orders to join a patrol line known as GRUPPE IGEL (Group Hedgehog).  Accordingly to HUNGERSHAUSEN, this line was divided into two parts - IGELI was to cover the north-western approaches to Ireland while IGEL II covered the western approaches to the Bristol Channel.  (See C.B.04051(99) ).  Before U.91 could take up her proper station in this formation, she received a signal from Control ordering her to join about fifteen other U-Boats in an attack on a convoy.  She was informed that there would be co-operation with units of the German Air Force and she was urged to to do her utmost against the enemy.  The ship's company looked forward to this attack with enthusiasm, feeling that it would be reminiscent of the old days of U-Boat warfare.  
     
     

 

 
 
 
7
 
     
  (iv)  A Convoy Sighting
          Each U-Boat in the prospective group signalled her position and, on about 15th February, a convoy sighting signal was received from aircraft via Control.  Some time later U.91 began to home on three contact keeping buoys which had been dropped from the planes.  At dawn, date unspecified, she sighted masts of ships, hull down on the horizon.  Having no orders to attack, and being unwilling to risk being sighted by the convoy, HUNGERSHAUSEN submerged and soon lost contact with the prey.  No aircraft appeared and eventually U.91 received a signal from Control explaining that due to engine difficulties the planes had been forced to break off operations.  The U-Boat crew were greatly disappointed and felt that they had been let down badly by the Luftwaffe.  
          Some time later, U-91 received a signal ordering her to join a new group that was being formed.  
     
 
III.  SINKING OF U.91
 
     
  (i)  First Attack  
          U.91 was proceeding surfaced at about 2330 on 25th February, 1944, when as warning was received on the Naxos G.S.R.  Believing that an enemy aircraft was in the vicinity, HUNGERSHAUSEN submerged.  About 30 minutes later H.E. was reported. but the Captain refused to believe that danger was imminent and remained at a depth of 60 metres (196.8 ft.)  To his great surprise and dismay, a number of depth charge explosions were heard about 100 yards astern.  Fearing that the screw noises might be from a support group and not a convoy, he went deeper.  
          (N.I.D. Note.  On 25th February, H.M.S. "GORE" of E.G.1 obtained an asdic contact in position 49°45'N., 26°20'W.  At 2302-1/2 a pattern of eight depth charges was fired and the U-Boat went deep.)  
     
  (ii)  Subsequent Attacks  
          More depth charges were dropped, the third pattern inflicting severe damage.  The U-Boat was drive to a depth well below 200 meters (656 ft.).  An external tank was ruptured causing her to list.  The W/T equipment was smashed and there was water entry in the Diesel room, causing her to be about 20 heavy by the stern.  Tanks were blown but the U-Boat failed to respond.  On repeating to blow she rose slowly to a depth of about 170 metres (557 ft.).  More depth charges fell as the U-Boat again lost trim and became heavy by the stern.  Once more tanks were blown and she shot to the surface unexpectedly, before arrangements for scuttling and abandoning ship had been made.  Upon reaching the surface, the Diesels were started as the enemy vessels opened fire.  HUNGERSHAUSEN hastily fired a T.5 torpedo (Gnat), but it was wide of the mark.  He then gave the order to abandon ship and the Engineer Officer opened the vents.  The U-Boat did not sink, however, and he was forced to go below again and set scuttling charges.  It was stated that these detonated satisfactorily but still the U-Boat remained on the surface.  She was finally sent to the bottom by British gunfire.  (N.I.D. Note.  Five patterns of depth charges were dropped on the U-Boat between 2302-1/2 on 25th February and 0240 on 26th February.  During the last attack, loud tank blowing noises were heard.  The U-Boat surfaced and was picked up by radar.  At 0250, H.M. Ships "GORE" and "AFFLECK" opened fire while the U-Boat was under way.  "AFFLECK" Maneuvered along the starboard side and was rammed, but little damage was done.  The U-Boat's crew then began to wave dirty linen and fire was ceased.  The U-Boat listed 20° to port, her bows lifted in the air, and she hung in this position for 30 minutes.  "AFFLECK" was about to fire throwers when the U-Boat sank, stern first, disappearing from sight at 0325.)  
     
APPENDIX "A"
 
 
 
BUILDING AND WORKING UP OF U.91
 
     
          U.91 was commissioned at the Flenderwerke, Lubeck, on 28th January, 1942.  Officers at the time of commissioning were Oberleutnant z. See HEINZ WALKERLING of the 1935 term, Commanding Officer; Oberleutnant z. See WILZER, First Lieutenant (probably WOLF-WERNER WILZER of the April, 1937, term); Leutnant z, See KULL, Second Watchkeeping Officer (probably ROBERT KULL of the December, 1939, term); and Leutnant (Ing.) HEINRICH, Engineer Officer (possibly JOHAN HEINRICH of the October, 1937 term).  
          The U.A.K. trials at Kiel and the working up exercises in the Baltic were described as normal.  The U-Boat returned to Königsberg for final adjustments.  
     
     
     
     

 

 
 
 
8
 
     
 
APPENDIX "B"
 
 
 
PREVIOUS PATROLS OF U.91
 
     
  (i)  First Patrol  
          U.91 sailed from Kiel on 15th August, 1942, with several other U-Boats.  On 17th August she called at Kristiansand S. and then proceeded through the Rosengarten to her patrol area.  This was said to have been in about 50°N., 40°W.  There she sank two destroyers from a west-bound convoy and was herself subjected to depth charge attacks.  Later she sank a 7,000-ton ship from another convoy.  On passage to base she was refuelled by a supply U-boat commanded by WOLFBAUER.  (N.I.D. Note.  KK. d. R. WOLFBAUER commanded U.463 which was sunk during the summer of 1943.  
          U.91 arrived at Brest on 6th October, 1942, where she joined the 9th Flotilla.  In Brest, Oberleutnant z. See MULLER joined her as Third Watchkeeping Officer.  (N.I.D. Note.  As this officer only made one patrol in U.91 he was probably on board as C.O. under instruction.)  
     
  (ii)  Second Patrol  
          U.91 sailed from Brest on 1st November, 1942, and proceeded to her operational area off the west coast of Africa in the latitude of Casa Blanca.  One day while proceeding submerged, the U-Boat was surprised by surface craft and was depth charged.  Slight damage was sustained.  The U-Boat headed north at slow speed, without sighting anything.  Towards the end of that patrol she was again supplied by WOLFBAUER.  She reached Brest on 27th December, 1942.  
     
  (iii)  Third Patrol  
          The third patrol was WALKERLING's last in U.91.  The other officers were:  Oberleutnant KLUTH, First Lieutenant (probably GERHARD KLUTH of the October, 1937, term); Leutnant z. See KULL, Second Watchkeeping Officer; Oberleutnant (Ing.) HEINRICH, Engineer Officer, and Leutnant (Ing.) SCHWARZE, Assistant Engineer Officer (probably HEINZ SCHWARZE of the December, 1939, term.)  
        The U-Boat sailed from Brest on 11th February, 1943, and operated in the North Atlantic.  There she sank four ships totalling 29,000 tons.  On passage to base through the Bay of Biscay, she claims to have shot down one enemy aircraft.  She arrived at Lorient on 28th March, where she was attached to the 10th Flotilla.
     
  (iv)  Fourth Patrol  
          WALKERLING left U.91 before the fourth patrol and HUNGERSHAUSEN assumed command.  The Engineer Officer was SCHWARZE, HEINRICH having left the boat.  
          The U-Boat sailed from Lorient on 28th April, 1943, and operated in the North Atlantic.  One night a destroyer was sighted dead astern, distant about 3,000 yards.  HUNGERSHAUSEN attempted to escape on the surface but the destroyer overhauled him and he was forced to submerge.  Several depth charges were dropped but no damage was sustained.  On passage to base a carrier borne aircraft was sighted and U.91 dived.  While proceeding submerged she heard bombs exploding some distance away.  When she surfaced, about 30 men were seen in the sea.  The U-Boat succeeded in picking up ten of them, six of whom died on board from exposure.  They proved to be of the crew of U.752 commanded by SCHROETER.  (N.I.D. Note.  U.752, commanded by Kapitänleutnant KARL ERNST SCHROETER of the 1934 term was sunk by aircraft from H.M.S. "ARCHER" in the Western Approaches on 23rd May, 1943.)  
          On 2nd or 3rd June, 1943, U.91 arrived at Brest.  These the 88 mm. (3.46 in.) deck gun was removed, the lower bandstand was added and a 20 mm. (0.79 in.) quadruple gun mounted.  
     
  (v)  Fifth Patrol  
          On the penultimate patrol, Oberleutnant z. See SCHARMER became First Lieutenant and DR. SEEBACHER the Medical Officer joined.  
          The U-Boat sailed from Brest on 22nd September, 1943, and proceeded to her operational area south of Greenland.  There she joined a patrol line known as "Gruppe Rossbach."  The sea was running high, and after being out for about two weeks, the 20 mm. quadruple mounting was so badly bent that it was utterly useless.  Some time later, the U-Boat was attacked by an aircraft which dropped several depth charges.  The U-Boat remained surfaced and opened fire with her twin 20 mm. guns.  Several hits were scored which forced the aircraft to disengage.  The night following this incident, U.91 sighted a destroyer, bearing about green 55.  The U-Boat fired a T.5 torpedo (Gnat) with N.S. setting.  (N.I.D. Note.  The N.S. setting for T.5 torpedo is for use when attacking a retiring target.  See C.B. 04051(94), page 8.)  The torpedo failed to hit, ran for about 15 minutes, and exploded.  U.91 dived and was subjected to a series of depth charge attacks.  
          On passage to base, U.91 met a supply U-Boat.  Other U-Boats including one commanded by Kapitänleutnant JOACHIM DEECKE, were present at the rendezvous.  (N.I.D. Note.  DEECKE was C.O. of U.584.)  Before the refuelling could be carried out the U-Boats were attacked by aircraft and dived.  HUNGERSHAUSEN believed that DEECKE had been sunk.  Later, U.91 finally was supplied with 25 tons of fuel from a supply U-Boat commanded by Kapitänleutnant BURGHAGEN.  This sequence of events lasted about ten days during which U.91 was frequently harassed by carrier borne aircraft.  HUNGERSHAUSEN estimated that six or seven U-Boats were lost as a result of the various attempts at refuelling.  
          U.91 arrived in Brest on 22nd November, 1943.  In base, a new 37 mm. gun was submitted for the 20 mm. quadruple mounting.  Leutnant NARJES became First Lieutenant and a Leutnant HELMUT WOLF, the Second Watchkeeping Officer.  
     
     
     
     

 

 
 
 
9
 
     
 
APPENDIX "C"
 
 
 
NOMINAL ROLL OF U.91
 
     
 
(i)  Survivors:
 
 
 
 
Name.
Rank.
English Equivalent.
Born.
HUNGERSHAUSEN, Heinz Kapitänleutnant Lieutenant
5.12.16
NARJES, Karl Heinz Leutnant zur See Junior Sub-Lieutenant
30.1.24
SEEBACHER, Erich Marineoberstabsarzt Suegeon-Lieutenant
6.1.15
RITTERMANN, Hans Obermaschinist Chief Stoker and Chief E.R.A, 1st or 2nd Class
18.2.15
REDER, Wolfgang Obersteuermann C.P.O. (Navigation)
9.4.18
REHDER, Willi Maschinenmaat Leading Stoker and E.R.A., 5th Class
18.12.21
AVERKAMP, Theodor
do.
do.
31.12.21
SEIDENFUSS, Josef Matrosenobergefreiter Able Seaman
5.9.23
HOPPNER, Heinz
do.
do.
5.12.21
KILGER, Max Matrosengefreiter
do.
5.9.23
JASCHINIOK, Alfons Maschinenobergefreiter Stoker, 1st Class
18.2.24
PETER, Ottomar
do.
do.
27.8.23
SPANGENBERG, Erich
do.
do.
11.4.24
SCHLAUGH, Fritz
do.
do.
12.9.20
BOHM, Werner Funkgefreiter Telegraphist
18.12.23
HARTMANN, Hermann Mechainkergefreiter Able Seaman (S.T.)
20.1.25
 
 
 
 
Officers . .
3
Chief and Petty Officers . .
2
Men . .
11
   
16
 
     
  (ii)  Casualties:  
 
Name.
Rank.
English Equivalent.
WOLF, Heinz Leutnant zur See Junior Sub-Lieutenant
SCHWARZE, Werner Leutnant (Ing.) Junior Sub-Lieutenant (E)
GIEL, Walter Stabsobermaschininst Staff Chief Stoker and Chief E.R.A., 1st or 2nd Class
SCHAUFLER, Karl Oberbootsmannsmaat Acting P.O. (Seaman's Branch)
SCHNEIDER, Obermaschinenmaat Acting Stoker P.O. and E.R.A.4th Class
HENNINGS, Erich
do.
do.
WEICHERT,
do.
do.
ELSASSER, Karl Obermechanikersmaat Acting P.O. (Leading Torpedoman)
BRUCKNER, Heinz Bootsmannsmaat Leading Seaman
FISCHER, Heinz
do.
do.
JAKOB, Hans Maschinenmaat Leading Stoker and E.R.A. 5th Class
SCHMIDT, Walter Funkmaat Leading Telegraphist
GOTTING, Jack
do.
do.
KEIPP, Richard Matrosenobergefreiter Able Seaman
BUCHACHER, Ullrich
do.
do.
SCHIFFELHUBER, Georg
do.
do.
HOVELER, Georg
do.
do.
DARGEL, Kurt
do.
do.
VETTER, Werner
do.
do.
MATUSCHACK,
do.
do.
SLUSAREK, Heinz Matrosengefreiter
do.
MOSIG,
do.
do.
LANGE,
do.
do.
PULKOWSKI, Kurt Maschinenobergefreiter Stoker, 1st Class
MEIER, Herbert
do.
do.
RIKEN, Hans
do.
do.
RISS, Heinrich
do.
do.
GATZA, Theo
do.
do.
HOMUTH Maschinengefreiter
do.
KELLER
do.
do.
LADEWIG
do.
do.
WITTE
do.
do.
WEIDENFELD, Willi Funkobergefreiter Telegraphist
KASPAR, Josef Funkegefreiter
do.
HILLENBRANDT, Bruno Mechanikergefreiter Able Seaman (S.T.)
KRUGER, Werner
do.
do.
 
     
Officers . .
2
Chief and Petty Officers . .
6
Men . .
28
   
36
     
  (iii)  Total Crew:  
     
 
Officers . .
5
Chief and Petty Officers . .
8
Men . .
39
   
52
 
     
     

 

 
 
 
10
 
     
 
 
PART V - U.358
 
 
 
I.  INTRODUCTORY REMARKS
 
 
 
  (i)  General  
          U.358, a 500-ton U-Boat commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rolf MANKE, was sunk on 1st March, 1944, by ships of Escort Group 1 in position 45°47'N. 23°17'W.  She was sunk on her fifth patrol.  During the course of her history she claimed the sinking of four merchant vessels totalling 20,500 tons, and one destroyer.  
     
  (ii)  Complement  
 
        Of the complement of fifty officers and men, only one, an Able Seaman, survived the sinking.  The Commanding Officer, Rolf MANKE of the 1935 term, was heartily disliked by the survivor, who said the men considered him unnecessarily strict.  He was formerly an Air Force officer, and later served as C.O. for training in U 575, commanded by Klt. Ernst HEYDEMANN.  The two Watchkeeping Officers, Oberleutnant z.S. OPPENS and Leutnant z.S. HEINZ, as well as the Engineer Officer, Lt. (Ing.) WIEBE, were all lower deck promotions.  A fifth officer, Oberleutnant JACOBY, was aboard on the last patrol as C.O. under instruction.  (N.I.D. Note.  This may be Horst JACOBY of the April, 1937, term.)
 
     
 
II.  FIFTH AND LAST PATROL OF U.358
 
 
 
  (i)  U.358 Sails  
          U.358 sailed from St. Nazaire early in the afternoon of 14th February, 1944, on her fifth and last patrol.  She was accompanied by three other U-Boats, U 575 and two other unidentified boats.  U.575 was carrying out trials and returned to base after a short period.  The remaining three boats proceeded to their operational areas.  They were escorted as far as the 100 fathom line by a number of M-class minesweepers.  
     
  (ii)  The Patrol  
          U.358 proceeded through the Bay of Biscay submerged most of the time.  There were no aircraft alerts and, up to the time of the sinking, no events of any significance took place.  
     
 
III.  SINKING OF U.358
 
     
  (i)  First Attack  
          U.358 was surprised and attacked on 29th February, 1944.  She was proceeding at a depth of about 30 m. (98.4 ft.) while minor repairs were being carried out in the control room.  The sole survivor had been relieved from watch at 0600 and was lying in his bunk in the forward torpedo room.  He suddenly became aware of screw noises.  He realized that there was so much hammering in the control room that the hydrophone operator couldn't hear them.  Shortly thereafter, however, a report came from the listening room that there were three destroyers in the vicinity, bearing red 150, green 100, and dead ahead.  Noise of asdic could be heard and MANKE gave the order to go deeper.  Immediately following this, the first pattern of depth charges fell, extinguishing the lights and forcing the boat to a depth of 200 m. (656 ft.).  (N.I.D. Note.  At 0507 on 29th February, 1944, H.M.S. "GARLIES" of E.G.1 obtained contact at 1,600 yards.  H.M.S. "AFFLECK" carried out a hedgehog attack at 0550.)  
     
  (ii)  Subsequent Attacks  
          Throughout most of the subsequent attacks, the U-Boat remained at a depth of between 180 and 200 metres (590 and 656 feet).  Pattern after pattern fell around the U-Boat.  Eventually she became heavy by the stern and those men not on duty were ordered forward in an attempt to retain trim.  At first the spirits of the crew were high because no serious damage was sustained and they believed that their attackers would soon expend all their depth charges.  As depth charges continued to fall with regularity and accuracy, their hopes of escape began to wane.  (N.I.D. Note. Between 0550 and 1732 on 29th February, the ships of E.G.1 carried out fifteen depth charge attacks.)  
          During the night of 29th February/1st March, U.358 managed to elude her pursuers for a brief period and took advantage of the situation by surfacing to ventilate.  Soon, however, she was detected by the destroyers and was forced to dive again.  (N.I.D. Note.  After the attack at 1732 on 29th February, it was decided to cease firing for the night and to hold contact until foul air caused the U-Boat to surface.  Contact was maintained throughout the night without hitch and at dawn the attack was resumed.)  
     
     

 

 
 
 
11
 
     
          The attack was resumed and after some hours, the air in the U-Boat became extremely foul.  Potash cartridges relieved the discomfort only temporarily and when the supply of these was exhausted, oxygen and compressed air was released into the boat.  The survivor said that it was fortunate that the men had been forbidden the use of tobacco for a few days before the sinking because of some petty offense.  Otherwise, they would not have been able to hold out as long as they did.
          Because of the foul air and the state of exhaustion of his men MANKE finally decided to surface and attempt to fight it out.  Upon reaching the surface, a destroyer was seen, distant about 400 yards.  The angling gear was quickly adjusted and a T.5 (Gnat) torpedo fired from Tube V.  The torpedo hit amidships and broke the destroyer in two.  (N.I.D. Note.  At 1920 "GOULD" had just left the echo on her port quarter and "AFFLECK" had regained it on her port beam when suddenly instead of one transmission in five being heard, crackling results were obtained. At this moment, "GOULD" was torpedoed in the after motor room on her port side.  She broke in half, the stern breaking away and sinking rapidly in position 45°46'N., 23°10'W.  The S.O.E.G.1 believed that an ordinary torpedo had been used.)
          After this incident, the other destroyers opened fire and scored many hits.  The prisoner spoke with awe of the 40 mm. gunfire which he observed to be especially deadly.  MANKE gave the order to abandon ship and went on the bridge with a white cloth in his hand, intending to surrender.  Before he could do so, he was wounded and fell to the deck.  About thirty minutes after she had surfaced, the U-Boat was sunk.  (N.I.D. Note.  The U-Boat's conning tower was sighted 1,500 yards on "AFFLECK's" port beam and she turned towards, dropping one depth charge as an anti-gnat precaution.  She then pursued the U-Boat, opening fire with oerlikons.  She fired twice with her starboard throwers, both times scoring perfect shots.  A dirty white flag was then noticed flying from the U-Boat's bridge.  At about 1950 in position 45°47'N., 23°17'W., the U-Boat sank bows first.)  
     
 
APPENDIX "A"
 
 
 
 
BUILDING AND WORKING UP OF U.358
 
     
          U.358 was commissioned at the Flensburger Schiffsbau, Flensburg on 15th August, 1942.  Officers at the time were Kapitänleutnant MANKE, C.O., Leutnant zur See ULBER, First Lieutenant (N.I.D. Note.  Probably Max ULBER of the December, 1939, term)  Leutnant zur See HOSS, Second Watchkeeping Officer and Leutnant (Ing.) WIEBE, Engineer Officer.  
     
 
APPENDIX "B"
 
 
 
 
PREVIOUS PATROLS OF U.358
 
     
  (i)  First Patrol  
          U.358 sailed from Kiel about 12th January, 1943, on her first patrol.  She operated South of Greenland.  On about 21st January a freighter of 3,500 tons was sunk from a convoy.  From other sources it is believed that U.358 was operating in a pack known as "Gruppe Haudegen" at this time.  At dawn a few days later a new 12,500 ton tanker sailing independently was sighted.  A spread of four torpedoes was fired but the speed of the vessel had been miscalculated and all missed.  The U-Boat then proceeded surfaced, at full speed, and took station ahead of the tanker.  She submerged to periscope depth and fired two more torpedoes both of which hit, setting the tanker on fire.  She burned for a long time and the U-Boat surfaced while the crew gathered on deck to watch the sight and to take snapshots.  The sinking was later broadcast by DOENITZ himself who said that it had taken place southeast of Greenland and that the tanker had been loaded with 18,000 tons of oil.  (N.I.D. Note.  Possibly the Norwegian tanker NORTIND, a straggler from HX 223.  This tanker was missing and presumed lost by enemy action in approximate position 59°00'N., 39°00'W., on 25th January, 1943.)  
          The patrol lasted 54 days and ended at St. Nazaire where the U-Boat was attached to the 7th Flotilla.  While in port preparing for her next patrol the upper deck containers were removed.  
     
  (ii)  Second Patrol  
          The second patrol took place during May and June, 1943, and lasted 24 days.  The U-Boat again operated in the North Atlantic and claimed sinking two ships from a convoy.  One was described as being 8,000 tons and one of 6,500 tons.  The U-Boat was operating in a group at the time.  She was herself attacked and a diving tank was damaged by depth-charges.  
          As a result of this attack she was forced to cut short her patrol and return to St. Nazaire.  ULBER left the boat at the end of this patrol and Olt. OPPENS became First Lieutenant.  
     
  (iii)  Third Patrol  
          The third patrol of U.358 was her longest.  She sailed from St. Nazaire in July, 1943, and operated for twelve weeks off the west coast of Africa.  No shipping was attacked on this patrol but the U-Boat claimed to have shot down a Sunderland aircraft.  Survivors were rescued by another U-Boat.  
     
  (iv)  Fourth Patrol  
          This patrol lasted about seven weeks.  The U-Boat operated in the North Atlantic, remained submerged much of the time and scored no success.  She refuelled from a supply U-Boat.  The patrol ended in St. Nazaire in December, 1943.  While nearing that port a mine exploded near the U-Boat without inflicting any damage.  
     
     

 

 
 
 
12
 
 
 
APPENDIX "C"
 
 
 
___________
 
 
 
 
NOMINAL ROLL OF U.358
 
 
 
 
(i)  Survivors:
 
 
 
 
Name.
Rank.
English Equivalent.
Born.
Exkert, Alfons Matrosengefreiter Able Seaman 21.3.23
 
 
 
 
Officers . .
--
Chief and Petty Officers . .
--
Men . .
1
   
1
 
 
 
 
(ii)  Casualties:
 
 
 
 
Name.
Rank.
English Equivalent.
MANKE, Rolf Kapitänleutnant Lieutenant
OPPENS Oberleutnant zur See Sub-Lieutenant
JACOBY, Jorst (?) Oberleutnant zur See (Kommandantenschüler) Sub-Lieutenant (Prospective C.O. on training patrol)
HEINZ Leutnant zur See Junior Sub-Lieutenant
WIEBE, Wolfgang Leutnant (Ing.) Junior Sub-Lieutenant (E)
NOLTING Obermaschinist Chief Stoker and Chief E.R.A., 1st or 2nd Class
STAPLER
do.
do.
STADLER Obersteuermann C.P.O. (Navigation)
SZYLAVI Obermaschinenmaat Acting P.O. Stoker and E.R.A. 4th Class
ZIMMERMANN
do.
do.
URBANIAK Oberfunkmaat Acting P.O. Telegraphist
NOSKE Obersanitätsmaat Acting Sick Berth P.O.
TEICH Bootsmannsmaat Leading Seaman
HHIRSCHEL
do.
do.
MUELLER
do.
do.
BERGMANN Maschinenmaat Leading Stoker and E.R.A. 5th Class
SIMMEL
do.
do.
GODERT
do.
do.
WILLEBRANDT
do.
do.
MUELLER Funkmaat Leading Telegraphist
SCHROEDER Matrosenobergefreiter Able Seaman
MOCKENHAUPT
do.
do.
FUCHS
do.
do.
DERKSEN
do.
do.
WEBER
do.
do.
SCHACK
do.
do.
DRESSLER
do.
do.
KOLLEGER
do.
do.
NIKOLAI
do.
do.
UFFING
do.
do.
BAUER Matrosengefreiter
do.
HARTUNG Maschinenobergefreiter Stoker, 1st Class
HORNE
do.
do.
STREIBING
do.
do.
RAUH
do.
do.
JAGODZINSKI
do.
do.
TOBI
do.
do.
KUCKELHAHN
do.
do.
NOLDT
do.
do.
NEUMANN Maschinengefreiter
do.
BERG
do.
do.
NAVROTH
do.
do.
BECKER
do.
do.
LUTTENBERGER Funkobergefreiter Telegraphist
WAGNER
do.
do.
BOTTINGER Mechanikerobergefreiter Able Seaman (S.T.)
MOESINGER
do.
do.
JENISCHEN Mechanikergefreiter (A) Able Seaman (Q.O.)
PAULI Matrose I Ordinary Seaman
 
 
 
 
Officers . .
5
Chief and Petty Officers . .
7
Men . .
37
   
49
 
 
 
 
(iii)  Total Crew:
 
 
Officers . .
5
Chief and Petty Officers . .
7
Men . .
38
   
50
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
13
 
     
 
PART VI - U.744
 
 
 
I.  INTRODUCTORY REMARKS
 
 
 
  (i)  General  
          U.744 was sunk on 6th March, 1944, at 1541 in position 5201N., 2237'W. by ships in Escort Group C.2 after having been subjected to a relentless attack for more then thirty hours.  
          The U-Boat was on her second patrol when she was sunk.  Both patrols had been in the Atlantic and on them she had claimed the sinking of four merchant vessels totalling 9,000 tons and a destroyer.  
     
  (ii)  Complement  
          Forty of her complement of 51 survived.  The Commanding officer, Oberleutnant zur See Heinz BLISCHKE of the October 1938 term, was killed by gunfire at the sinking.  He was well liked by his men but as a Commanding Officer was not especially admired by them.  The First Lieutenant, Leutnant zur See Helmuth Jonas of the October, 1940 term, was polite and only moderately secure.  He had served for a time in minesweepers in the Channel and later made three patrols in a U-Boat commanded by SCHLIPPENBACH in the Mediterranean, as Second Watchkeeping Officer.  He joined U.744 on commissioning as Second Watchkeeping Officer and was appointed as First Lieutenant at the end of the first patrol.  The Second Watchkeeping Officer, Leutnant zur See Arnold REHBERG of the May, 1941, term, is a firm but not a fanatical Nazi.  He made only the last patrol in U.744.  The Engineer Officer, Leutnant (Ing.) Günther DREISSIG of the October, 1940, term, is an arrogant boor with no manners whatsoever.  His ideas follow the approved Nazi pattern.  
          The ratings were rather more forthcoming than those from other U-Boats recently interrogated.  
     
II.  SECOND AND LAST PATROL OF U.744
     
  (i)  False Starts  
          U.744 sailed from Brest on 20th February, 1944, while workmen were still on board adjusting the Diesels and the fuel oil feed lines.  It was planned to have the dockyard staff taken ashore by the escort vessels but they were unable to effect the repairs in time and the U-Boat was forced to return to port.  
          On 21st February she sailed again.  After clearing the harbour the 37 mm. gun was tested and jammed on the second round.  Efforts to repair the gun failed and the U-Boat once more put back.  On the occasion of one of these false starts, U.744 was accompanied by a U-Boat commanded by Oberleutnant KRUSCHKA.  
     
  (ii)  Final Sailing  
          The U-Boat finally sailed on 24th February.  While proceeding through the Bay of Biscay many G.S.R. warnings were received.  On each occasion R.D.B's were released and the U-Boat dived.  Three or four R.D.B's were streamed.  
     
  (iii)  Aircraft Attack  
          On 29th February, a warning was received on the Naxos and the U-Boat dived.  About an hour later she surfaced, another Naxos warning was received and again she dived.  On the third occasion BLISCHKE decided to ignore the warning and remain surfaced.  An aircraft closed, illuminated the U-Boat with its searchlight and dropped three or four bombs.  They fell close enough to shake the U-Boat but inflicted no damage.  The 37 mm. gun was manned and four magazines were fired at the aircraft, one prisoner believing that it had been hit as it continued on its course without returning to attack.  (N.I.D. Note.  Liberator "J" of 244 Squadron illuminated a surfaced U-Boat in position 48°04'N., 11°57'W. on 29th February and dropped six depth-charges.  No results were observed.  Inaccurate flak was experienced.)  
     
  (iv)  Attack on a Convoy  
          U.744 sighted a convoy on 3rd March, 1944, consisting of four small tankers and two destroyers.  The U-boat attacked with a spread of four torpedoes.  All the prisoners were convinced that three of the tankers were sunk.  One man entered the incident in his diary and another claimed that a fourth tanker was hit.  Prisoners stated that the U-Boat then fired a T.5 torpedo (Gnat) from Tube V, sinking one of the escorting destroyers.  (N.I.D. Note.  Probably L.S.T. 362, torpedoed and sunk in 48°00'N, 17°23'W. at 0259z on 2nd March.  At 0345z H.M.S. "ROCKWOOD," the only escort, made an attack on the U-Boat, which is considered to have escaped undamaged.)  
          At about this time a defect in one of the Diesel cylinder heads developed and a new head was fitted.  
     
  (v)  Special Operation  
          It was stated that the U-Boat was to have proceeded to a position just outside REYKJAVIK to attack shipping.  She was to relieve another U-Boat which had been stationed there.  She had been supplied with elaborate charts on which the Channel was marked and the location of minefields and net defences was indicated.  BLISCHKE, however, decided that as he only had six torpedoes left he would not attempt this operation.  
     
     

 

 
 
 
14
 
     
  (vi)  Attack on a Destroyer
          Early on the morning of 5th March, 1944, after U.744 had charged batteries, she submerged.  Some time later, H.E. was heard and the U-Boat surfaced to observe any possible targets.  Nothing was seen for a time though the H.E. became stronger.  Suddenly a destroyer was sighted about 500 yards dead astern.  The U-Boat fired a T.5 (Gnat) from her stern tube and then submerged.  A detonation was heard and most of the prisoners believed that the destroyer had been sunk.  One of then stated, however, that the torpedo failed to find its mark, ran its course, and exploded at the end of the run.  (N.I.D. Note.  No such incident can be traced.)  
     
 
III.  SINKING OF U.744
 
     
  (i)  U.744 is attacked  
          After firing at the destroyer U.744 dived to a depth of about 100 metres (328 ft.).  Screw noises were heard and the W/T operator interpreted than as emanating from two destroyers and a large vessel, possibly an aircraft-carrier, proceeding at slow speed.  This was followed by noises thought to be a convoy passing above the U-Boat.  
          At about 1020, faint but distinct H.E. was again heard.  The First Lieutenant thought that two destroyers were near, bearing respectively red 30 and green 90, proceeding at very slow speed.  There was a moment of eerie silence suddenly broken by the crash of exploding depth charges as the first pattern fell.  The lights were momentarily extinguished but no further damage was inflicted.  The U-Boat went to 150 metres (402 ft.) and throughout the subsequent attacks attempted to maintain that depth.  (N.I.D. Note.  At 1002 on 5th March the first contact was obtained by H.M.C.S. "GATINEAU" (EG.C2) in approximate position 52°02'N, 22°26'W.  At 1028 a pattern of ten depth charges was fired by H.M.C.S. "ST. CATHARINES.")  
          For the next thirty-one hours U.744 was subjected to a relentless hunt.  About every thirty minutes depth-charges fell, often in patterns of ten or twelve.  Prisoners estimated that a total of more than 350 depth-charges were fired.  Throughout the attack the U-Boat made as little movement as possible.  Pumps were used sparingly only when trim was disturbed by explosions.  The S.B.T. was not employed.  Occasionally evasive action was attempted by altering course sharply but the U-Boat was unable to elude her pursuers.  The prisoners spoke admiringly of the deadly accuracy of the search-gear of the destroyers and stated that the boat was usually in the very centre of each pattern dropped.  They said that two distinct asdic tones could be heard.  After about twenty-four hours of punishment the air in the boat became foul.  The men at action stations were ordered to lie on the floor plates and make as little movement as possible.  Potash cartridges were used and oxygen was released into the boat.  
     
  (ii)  Damage inflicted  
          At about 1000 on 6th March a certain amount of damage was sustained as a result of the attack.  The W/T equipment was rendered unserviceable, a diesel cylinder block was fractured and the circulating water flowed into the boat.  The Junkers compressor failed.  Small leaks occurred, the worst being in the forward torpedo room where the flanges on the torpedo tubes were damaged and water entered.  The most disastrous result of the attack was the damage to the air purifier, causing the potash cartridges to be no longer effective.  At the time of the attack the U-Boat was driven to a depth well below 200 metres (656 ft.).  Due to the water entry forward she proceeded down by the stern to avoid the possibility of a sudden dive.  
     
(iii)  The U-Boat surfaces
          Due to the lack of air and exhaustion of the batteries, BLISCHKE decided to surface.  He still believed that only two destroyers were present and hoped to torpedo one and engage the other with the 37 mm. gun.  The batteries were so low that the U-Boat could not be brought to the surface with the motors.  BLISCHKE gave the order to blow tanks and the boat rose to a depth of 120 m. (393.6 ft.) and there came to a stop.  More air was used and she suddenly bobbed to the surface like a cork.  The engine-room ratings attempted to start the Diesels but found that air pressure was so reduced that it was impossible to do so.  Meanwhile BLISCHKE was the first through the conning-tower hatch and was astonished to discover that there were five, not two, enemy ships present.  Before he could collect his wits the destroyers opened fire and he fell wounded inside the conning-tower fairing and was not seen again.  
          The Engineer Officer, having no taste for battle, gave the order to abandon ship, but the men refused to go on deck because of the heavy gunfire.  The First Lieutenant finally convinced them that it was safer than remaining below and they crowded through the hatch and over the side.  Several of the officers were careful to fill their brief-cases with personal belongings before abandoning ship.  The Engineer Officer remained below to set scuttling charges but, being more concerned with his own safety than with the destruction of his boat, failed to set them properly.  
          (N.I.D. Note.  Between 1028 on 5th March and 1100 on 6th March ships in E.G. C.2 carried out 24 depth charge attacks.  At 1210 on 6th March the submerged U-Boat settled down to a steady course.  At 1532 she surfaced and all ships opened fire.  The crew abandoned the boat which was listing and circling slowly to port.  At 1550 two explosions, thought to be scuttling charges, were heard.  At 1805 H.M.S. "ICARUS" sank the U-Boat by torpedo in 52°01'N., 22°37'W.  Forty of the crew were picked up.)  
     
     

Click this text to view photographs of U-744 on the surface after attacks by Support Group C-2

 
 
 
15
 
     
 
APPENDIX "A"
 
 
 
 
BUILDING AND WORKING UP OF U.744
 
     
          U.744 was built at the Schichauwerft, Danzig, where she was commissioned on 5th June, 1943.  At that time her First Lieutenant was Leutnant zur See JOBST (probably Kurt JOBST of the October, 1939, term) and her Second Watchkeeping Officer was Leutnant JONAS.  
          According to one prisoner the U.A.K. trials were carried out at Danzig.  The trials in the Baltic appear to have been normal.  Torpedo firing was carried out off Libau and due to heavy fog lasted for fourteen days.  The silent running trials were held at Rönne.  
          About 20th September, 1943, U.744 returned to Danzig and put in to the Holmwerft for final adjustments.  The bandstand was widened to accommodate the two new twin 20 mm. mountings and a second bandstand was added.  She then sailed for Hel, where she remained for three or four days while the C.O. did a refresher course.  This was followed by an eight day stay in Swinemünde for A/A practice and silent running tests at Sonderborg.  
          Late in October the U-Boat proceeded to Kiel where further adjustments were made, including the widening of the gangways on either side of the conning-tower and the removal of her mine ejection gear.  Late in November she embarked stores for her first patrol.  
     
 
APPENDIX "B"
 
 
 
 
FIRST PATROL OF U.744
 
     
        U.744 sailed from Kiel on 1st December, 1943, with U.390 and another 500-ton U-Boat commanded by MANNESMANN, believed to be U.230.  The three boats were escorted to Kristiansand S., where they arrived about midnight on 2nd December.  At 0400 on 3rd December, U.744 sailed independently for her operational area which was said to have been north-west of Ireland.  While passing between the Shetlands and the Faeroes trouble was experienced with the Junkers compressor which was repaired while under way.  One prisoner stated that in this area two British M.T.Bs. were sighted.  The U-Boat dived without being attacked.
          Shortly after Christmas U.744 sighted and attacked a large merchantman, said to be 12,000 tons, sailing independently.  Seven torpedoes were fired, at least one being a T 5.  The last was fired from a depth of 15 m. (49.2 ft.)  Some of the prisoners stated that all the torpedoes scored hits while others believed that only three found their mark.  All agreed, however, that the only effect of the attack was to cause the merchantman to increase her speed.  Control was informed that one hit was scored.  The phenomenon was variously explained by the prisoners as due to torpedo nets or to a counter mining device which caused the torpedoes to detonate 20 metres (65.6 ft.) from the target.  
          Prisoners stated that on 3rd January, 1944, U.744 obtained her first success, sinking a 6,000 ton freighter, which was attacked by day.  (N.I.D. Note.  Neither of these attacks can be identified with certainty.  "EMPIRE HOUSNAN," 7,359 tons, was torpedoed twice South of Iceland, once on 31st December, 1943, and again on 3rd January, 1944.)  
          Throughout the patrol operations were made difficult by the unusually heavy sea.  
          When the U-Boat arrived in Brest on 15th January, 1944, she was in a badly battered condition.  The Diesels and Diesel exhaust were not functioning properly and the 20 mm. quadruple mounting had been bent almost beyond recognition by the action of the sea.  The latter was dismounted and a new 37 mm. gun mounted instead.  Repairs to the Diesel were hurriedly carried out and the U-Boat made ready for her next patrol.  
     
 
APPENDIX "C"
 
 
 
 
TRANSLATION OF CAPTURED DOCUMENTS
 
     
  (i)  Document on torpedoes captured from U.744  
     
 
"NOTES ON TORPEDOES FOR ENGINEER OFFICERS (U-BOATS) SECRET HEADQUARTERS MATERIAL.
 
     
 
Torpedo Type.
Weight.
Water Displacement.
Negative Buoyancy.
Water surrounding (in tube).
 
T.1
1532 kg.
1254 kg.
278 kg.
426 kg.
T.1 Fat I
(3378 lbs.)
(2765 lbs.)
(613 lbs)
(939 lbs.)
 
T.III
1608 kg.
1332 kg.
276 kg.
348 kg.
T.III Fat II
(3546 lbs.)
(2937 lbs.)
(609 lbs.)
(767 lbs.)
 
T.V
1470 kg.
1415 kg.
55 kg.
265 kg.
 
(3241 lbs.)
(3120 lbs.)
(121 lbs.)
(584 lbs.)
 
T.IIIa Fat II
1785 kg.
1332 kg.
453 kg.
348 kg.
T.IIIa Lut I
(3936 lbs.)
(2937 lbs.)
(999 lbs.)
(767 lbs.)
 
M.T.A.
1550 kg.
1336 kg.
214 kg.
344 kg.
 
(3418 lbs.)
(2946 lbs.)
(472 lbs.)
(759 lbs.)"
 
     
  1 kg. = 2.205 lbs.  
     
 
(N.I.D. Note. (1) "T.I" is the standard 21-inch torpedo.
  (2) "T.I Fat I" is the same torpedo with Curly gear Type 1 fitted.
  (3) "T.III" is the 21-inch electric torpedo used with magnetic pistol "Pi 2."
  (4) "T.III Fat II" is the 21-inch electric with Curly gear Type 2 fitted.
  (5) "T.IIIa" is estimated to be a longer ranged T.III, probably to 7,000 yards.
  (6) "T.V" is the GNAT.
  (7) "Lut" is believed to be an improved Curly gear somewhat similar to "Fat."
  (8) "M.T.A." is estimated to be an electric torpedo capable of acting as a ground mine at the end of its run.  (A.G.M. 771A refers.).)
 
     
     

 

 
 
 
16
 
     
  (ii)  Flak Guns
          The following is a translation of a captured document containing a list of weapons, parts and tools embarked in U.744.  No date is given but it presumably refers to the period just prior to her last patrol.  
     
 
  Breechblock with actuating lever.
  Barrel cleaning rod with rammer staff.
  Telescope D/F 7X50.
       
        The following weapons and tools were received by U.744.
 
1
  3.7 cm. mounting M 42 Nr 047.
 
1
  3.7 cm. Automatic Nr. 3066.
 
2
  3.7 cm. Gun barrel with flash eliminator Nr. 3066A 3066B.
 
1
  Gear for crosslevelling the piece.
 
1
  Shield with fastening ring.
 
1
  Barrel spare part kit as per list.
 
1
  Leather case with tools as per list.
 
24
  Mounting screws with springs.
 
1
  Normal wrench.
 
1
  Firing mechanism.
 
1
  Socket wrench.
 
1
  Cleaning rod in two parts.
 
1
  Cleaning head.
 
1
  Steel wire cleaning rod with kerosene container.
 
1
  Cartridge puller with hexagonal ratchet wrench.
 
150
  Shell-casing clamps
 
1
  Recoil mechanism complete
 
1
  Recoil spring.
 
1
  Buffer fluid.
 
1
  Grease gun with hose.
 
1
  Chain pullers.
 
1
  Rammer B.
 
4
  Sets packing rings.
 
2
  Circular front sights.
 
2
  Twin mountings M 43 U Nr. 1235, 1248.
 
4
  2 cm. Flak 38 Automats M 353, M 3325, M 3226, 1139.
 
2
  Reserve Automats for twin barrel guns 1158, 1144.
 
8
  2 cm. Flak gun barrels 38 Nr. 1234/1 + 2, 1190/1 + 2, 1264/1 + 2, 1220/1 + 2.
 
1
  Spare part kit I as per list.
 
1
  Spare part kit II as per list.
 
8
  Umbralglasses w/cases.
 
120
  Magazines for 2 cm. Flak 38.
 
8
  Sets packing rings
 
1
  Grease gun with hose.
 
1
  Open wrench 40 x 42.
 
1
  Open wrench 52 x 55.
 
1
  Double wrench 14 x 17.
 
1
  Double wrench 19 x 22.
 
1
  Single wrench.
 
4
  Circular front sights.
 
2
  Shell-case catchers.
 
2
  MG 81 Z.
 
4
  Spare barrels, 2 shell-case catcher bags complete with two twin breech bolt recesses complete.  2 MG 81 Z 1 rests,   1 Cartridge case 41,  4 firing pin springs,  5 Flash eliminators,  2 bracing wires complete,  12 belt feed pawls, 2 pr. Umbral glasses with case,  1 Board case,  2 locks,  1 cartridge extracting tool,  1 angular screw driver,  1 oil can,  2 circular front sights w/case,  2 front sights w/ case,  36 ammunition boxes 41,  4 Belt feed boxes.
 
1
  Artillery telescope
 
1
  Stopwatch.
 
2
  MP 40 Nr. 2931, 3294.
 
1
  Very pistol (star shells).
 
1
  Twin barrel Very pistol.
 
10
  Pistols 7.65 mm.
 
10
  Safety belts.
 
10
  Straps.
 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

 

 
 
 
17
 
 
 
APPENDIX "D"
 
 
 
NOMINAL ROLL OF U.744
 
 
 
 
(i)  Survivors:
 
 
 
 
Name.
Rank.
English Equivalent.
Born.
JONAS, Hellmuth Leutnant zur See Junior Sub-Lieutenant
2.11.20
REHBERG, Arnold
do.
do.
11.10.17
DREISSIG, Gunter Leutnant (Ing.) Junior Sub-Lieutenant (E)
20.7.23
FEINHOLD, Kurt Obermaschinist  
12.4.17
HASSMANN, Heinz
do.
do.
27.4.14
BREIDENBEND, Heinz Oberbootsmannsmaat Acting P.O. (Seaman's Branch)
9.3.19
WERBECK, Hermann Obermaschinenmaat Acting Stoker P.O. and E.R.A. 4th Class
27.11.18
SCHWERDT, Walter Maschinenmaat Leading Stoker and E.R.A., 5th Class
20.2.21
STEINMEYER, Walter
do.
do.
29.11.21
WIEZOREK, Werner
do.
do.
2.4.22
KUHNE, Eugen
do.
do.
6.10.18
SPANJOL, Friedo Funkmaat Leading Telegraphist
22.4.21
PILZ, Hermann Mechanikersmaat Leading Torpedoman
17.3.22
VOLKMANN, Herbert Matrosenobergefreiter Able Seaman
2.1.23
BUSCH, Karl
do.
do.
6.5.22
BRAUCKMANN, Willi
do.
do.
17.6.23
TREM, Alfons
do.
do.
13.3.23
BOHUSCH, Rudolf
do.
do.
28.2.23
SCHARFENBERGER, Anton Matrosengefreiter
do.
30.1.24
RATSCH, Fritz
do.
do.
20.6.25
GRAMMER, August
do.
do.
26.5.23
HANTE, Erich
do.
do.
24.8.25
WEH, Franz
do.
do.
9.4.24
HENZE, Erich
do.
do.
17.1.25
SCHORR, Hans Maschinenobergefreiter Stoker, 1st Class
3.9.24
JANSEN, Karl
do.
do.
22.3.23
WORMSDORF, Heinz
do.
do.
4.11.23
SCHULTER, Heinz
do.
do.
1.10.19
LEID, Ruthardt
do.
do.
19.11.24
VOLBRACHT, Franz
do.
do.
26.12.22
BIERL, Ludwig Maschinengefreiter
do.
28.10.24
MIEMIETZ, Alois
do.
do.
15.6.24
VOLLRATH, Werner
do.
do.
15.4.24
LEINER, Hans
do.
do.
4.6.24
SCHMIDT, Kurt
do.
do.
1.1.24
LAABS, Johannes Funkobergefreiter Telegraphist
21.1.21
FROHLICH, Rudolf Funkgefreiter
do.
27.10.24
HANSEN, Josef
do.
do.
22.2.24
ERATH, Karl Mechanikergefreiter Able Seaman (S.T.)
22.10.23
BULL, Fritz
do.
do.
13.9.24
 
 
 
 
Officers . .
3
Chief and Petty Officers . .
4
Men . .
33
   
40
 
 
 
 
(ii)  Casualties:
 
 
 
 
Name.
Rank.
English Equivalent.
BLISCHKE, Heinz Oberleutnant zur See Sub-Lieutenant.
KURMPEL, Kurt Obersteuermann C.P.O. (Navigation).
MACHL Bootsmannsmaat Leading Seaman
GUTOWSKI
do.
do.
ZIMMERMANN Maschinenmaat Leading Stoker and E.R.A., 5th Class.
KROM Funkmaat Leading Telegraphist.
WOELKE Sanitätsmaat Leading Sick Berth Attendant.
RAICHLE Matrosenobergefreiter Able Seaman
HOSL Matrosengefreiter
do.
WITTE Maschinenobergefreiter Stoker, 1st Class
LISCHKE Maschinengefreiter
do.
 
 
 
 
Officers . .
1
Chief and Petty Officers . .
1
Men . .
9
   
11
 
 
 
 
(iii)  Total Crew:
 
 
Officers . .
4
Chief and Petty Officers . .
5
Men . .
42
   
51
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
18
 
     
 
PART VII - GENERAL
 
 
 
I.  GENERAL REMARKS ON U-BOATS
 
     
  (i)  Radar Decoy Spar Buoys (R.D.S.)  
          (a)  General.  U.91 and U.744 carried sixteen and twenty new radar decoy devices respectively on their last patrols.  These were referred to as "Thetis."  When assembled, this gear consists of a float from which extends a wooden spar or dummy periscope.  Beneath the float is a metal tube designed to keep the spar erect.  
          (b)  Assembly.  When not assembled, the tube and spar are each in two sections, the sections of the spars being stowed inside the tubes.  The tubes were secured in groups of five or six and stowed under the bunks.  The floats were stowed separately in the motor room.  When assembled, the various sections of tubes and spars were fitted together much like sections of a fishing rod and were then attached to the float.  Assembly was done in the conning tower and was said to be rather difficult due to the awkwardness of the shape of the gear.  
          (c)  Dimensions.  Sections of the spar and tube were about 5 ft. in length.  When assembled, the entire gear measured about 20 ft., 10 ft. extending above the surface of the water and 10 ft. below.  The float was about 24 ins. square and 6 ins. thick.  
          (d)  Spars.  On the wooden spar, a cluster of five leaf-like elements was placed every 4 ins.  One prisoner said that these flower-like devices were made of spring steel.  Others described them as being of metal and only one said that they were of tinfoil.  
          (e)  Float.  The float was said to have had the consistency of rubber sponge, but was described as being rather brittle.  It was grey-brown in colour and one prisoner suggested that it may have been built up in layers.  It was covered with a brownish green paint which had a dull finish.  
          (f)  Use.  When a G.S.R. warning was received, and R.D.S. was streamed from the conning tower.  This was done largely in the Bay of Biscay and, in the case of U.744, between 11° and 12°W.  The metal flowerlike clusters were said to give a radar echo very like that of the U-Boat periscope.  
          One prisoner stated that, after floating for about eighteen hours, the float disintegrated and the device sank.  
     
(ii)  G.S.R.
          An officer from U.91 stated that when orders were to submerge on receiving G.S.R. warnings, a crash dive was necessary when a Naxos warning was obtained.  This was due to the short range of this set.  He said that usually two or three short notes were heard, but that a good W/T operator would give the alarm on the first note.  
          Both U.91 and U.744 had experienced difficulties with their Naxos aerials.  These had been liable to breakdown and the delicate parts had not been adequately sheltered from the weather.  U.91 was fitted with a new Naxos aerial on her last patrol on the starboard side of the bridge fairing.  It had a box-like plywood cover for protection.  Two of these aerials were carried in U.91 and were stowed in the C.O.'s cabin.  No changes seem to have been made in the fundamental design.  
          U.744 carried a testing gear for Naxos which was known as "PUCK."  It was said to be contained in a wooden box, the dimensions of which were:  height 4.7 ins., length 6-7 ins., breadth 1.5 ins.  The gear was always stowed below decks except when used for testing.  When in use, it was placed on the conning tower fairing near the Naxos aerial.  (See C.B. 04051(95) for further details of Naxos.)  
     
  (iii)  New Type R.D.B.  
          U.744 was said by one prisoner to have carried a new type R.D.B.  The balloon was attached to the float by a chain.  The length of chain could be adjusted in accordance with wind conditions to enable the gear to drift down wind at a suitable speed.  The float was stated to have contained a noise-making gear which simulated the noise of a U-Boat.  
     
  (iv)  Walter Boats  
          Many of the prisoners from U.257, U.744 and U.91 had seen or heard of a type of U-Boat which they termed "Walter boats," but their statements were sometimes contradictory or inconclusive.  The description given by a W/T rating from U.744 appears to be the most reliable.  He had seen one of these boats lying alongside a nearby pier at Kiel-Wik and had watched her get underway.  He estimated the tonnage to be about 300 tons.  When she was made fast, the bow projected from the water at an angle and the stern was low in the water.  He understood that this was the normal trim while in harbour.  There was one hatch forward for loading torpedoes and a second hatch on the top of the conning tower.  The conning tower had transparent windows forward.  The exhaust was on the after end of the conning tower at deck level.  The following dimensions were given:  
 
Length overall 25 m (81 ft.)
Stem to conning tower 12 m (39.3 ft.)
Conning tower to stern 9 m (39.3 ft.)
Conning tower 4 m (13.1 ft.) long, 2 m (6.5 ft.) high.
Beam 2-2.5 m.  (6.5-8.2 ft.)
 
     
     

 

 
 
 
19
 
     
          This prisoner said that these boats were building at the Walter Werke, Kiel (N.I.D. Note.  Not identified), and he believed that some of them were ready for operation.  On the other hand, an officer from U.744 had been told by a Lieutenant serving in Walter boats that they were still in an experimental stage.  This officer had told him that one Walter boat had been commissioned in Kiel and one in Hamburg in November, 1943.  The submerged speed was said to be 28 knots.  He was uncertain on the surface speed, but said that it was less than 28 knots.  One Diesel was fitted for surface propulsion and an internal combustion turbine for submerged propulsion.  A small electric battery was carried for starting the turbine.  The boats were fitted with one rudder which, when surfaced, is clearly seen above water, astern.
          Several of the prisoners stated that Walter boats are commanded by C.P.O.s.  One prisoner from U.257 described the complement as consisting of a quartermaster, two petty officers, two engine room C.P.O.s. two torpedomen a cook, and one other rating.  
          One man had seen eighteen of these craft in Pillau, and a German Air Force Lieutenant had seen thirty or forty small U-Boats in the Bay of Danzig in December, 1943, engaged in tactical exercises.  He thought they might have been Walter boats.  (N.I.D. Note.  The Germans are believed to have experimented with more than one type of small submersible, including one called a "Walter Boat"; details are not clear; no Walter boat is believed to have been in war-like operations.)  
     
  (v)  Small U-Boats  
          A prisoner from U.91 spoke of small U-Boats which could remain submerged for 110 hours.  They had Diesels and electric motors and were described as faster than normal U-Boats.  An officer from U.91 spoke rather vaguely of a "Speer" type U-Boat which attained a submerged speed of 12 knots.  He believed that it was designed as a counter invasion measure.  
     
  (vi)  VII C 42 U-Boats  
          An officer from U.744 stated that this class is now building.  The boats have a new type pressure hull reinforced with double ribs and are tested to withstand pressure at a depth of 300 meters (984 feet).  They are supposed to have a submerged endurance of four or five days.  
     
  (vii)  VII D U-Boats  
          An officer from U.744 said that he had seen two 500-ton minelaying U-Boats in Brest in February, 1944.  These were U.214 and U.218, type VII D.  The compartmentation forward to aft was as follows:  bow compartment, C.P.O.s' quarters, ward room, C.O.'s cabin W/T room, control room, mine compartment, P.O.s' mess, galley, Diesel room, motor room.  Each boat carried about thirty mines as well as the normal outfit of torpedoes.  These U-Boats are no longer being built.  
     
(viii)  VIIF U-Boats
          Two prisoners from U.744 had seen a type VII F U-Boat at Hel in the autumn of 1943.  They described her as capable of carrying about forty torpedoes.  The type appeared to be about the same size as the normal VII C 500-tonner, but with a greater beam.  Eight to twelve torpedoes were stowed in upper deck containers, the remainder being in the bow and stern torpedo rooms.  The floor plates were on a higher level than in type VII C boats, thus allowing more torpedoes to be stowed in the bilges.  The boat was fitted with a special torpedo transfer derrick.  She had two twin 20 mm. mountings on the upper bandstand, one fully automatic 37 mm. gun on the lower bandstand, four torpedo tubes forward and one aft.  An officer from U.744 had seen two of these boats engaged in carrying torpedoes to Norwegian bases.  
          One prisoner had heard of a type IX F U-Boat which he believed was a 740-tonner designed for the same purpose as the type VII F.  (See C.B. 04051(93), pages 7-8.)  
     
  (ix)  Flak U-Boats  
          Flak U-Boats are now being used for normal operations.  The few that had gun platforms forward have had these removed.  
     
  (x)  New Type Main Motors  
          A prisoner from U.744 had heard of a new type main U-Boat motor in preparation.  It has a smaller diameter than the normal motor.  
     
  (xi)  "Max" Lifesaving Float  
          U.91 carried a type of life-saving gear on the upper deck, forward of the conning tower.  It was known as the "Max Rettungsboje" and was described as a rubber sheet folded like a parachute.  When needed it was thrown overboard where it would swell.  It was sufficiently large to accommodate about thirty men.  
     
  (xii)  New Type Extensible Air Intake  
          A new type of extensible Diesel air intake is to be fitted to all U-Boats according to an officer from U.744.  Unlike the Schnörkel (see C.B. 04051(99) ), it will operate as an air intake only, the exhaust to be expelled in the normal way.  It is to be housed forward of the conning tower, slightly to port, and at right angles to the pressure hull.  The extensible portion within the housing, is operated hydraulically from the control room.  When fully extended, it is the same height as the periscope.  Automatic trimming devices are to be fitted to prevent accidental submersion and to prevent water from entering the intake.  The purpose of this gear is to enable the U-Boat to charge batteries while submerged.  Thus the hot air from the exhaust will offer no target for radar.  
     
     

 

 
 
 
20
 
     
  (xiii)  Torpedoes
          (a)  T 5 (Gnat)  
          An officer from U.91 stated that the T 5 torpedo runs for fifteen or twenty minutes.  They are self destructive, exploding at the end of their run if they fail to hit the target.  This was denied by an officer from U.450.  They have not proved entirely satisfactory as they have a tendency to leak when the tubes are flooded, thus causing short circuits.  
          An officer from U.744 stated that if the T.5 fails to hit the target it becomes a circling torpedo, which always circles to port.  If, while circling, it picks up screw noises, the rudder swings hard in the direction of the noise.  If the noise is lost the rudder swings back to port and stays in this position until another noise is picked up.  The prisoner maintains that all circles have a radius of 95 metres (104 yds.).  He felt that the weakness of the torpedo lay in the length of time it took to change direction.  
          The general test of the T 5 is known as "Spechtprüfung."  
          (b)  Pi 4 Pistols.  Two modifications of these were described.  Pi 4A and Pi 4B.  Both are inertia magnetic pistols, the only difference being in the Pi 4A the pendulum is only free to move parallel to the axis of the torpedo, whereas in Pi 4B the pendulum is free to move in any direction.  It is believed that only Pi 4B is now being fitted to T 5 torpedoes.  
          (c)  T 6 Torpedoes  
          An officer from U.744 stated that the T 6 torpedo does not operate on acoustic principles.  Its new feature is a speed of 50 knots.  The torpedo is air driven and is to be used only at night.  
          (N.I.D. Note.  Survivors from U.406 mentioned T 6 torpedoes, which they stated were improved T 5's with a higher speed.  (See C.B. 04051(99), Section VI (xviii) ).  
          (d)  "Lut" Mechanism ("Lut" I and "Lut" II).  
        "Lut" mechanism was mentioned for the first time in a document captured from U.744.  (See Part VI, Appendix "C".)  It was described by the First Lieutenant of that boat, although no U-Boat from which prisoners have been obtained carried torpedoes fitted with "Lut" mechanism. 
          In general "Lut" is an improved "Fat" ("Curly") mechanism.  It was stated that the manufacture of the former is to supercede that of "Fat."  
          Torpedoes fitted with "Fat" mechanism follow a zig-zag track about a line at right angles to the original straight run of the torpedo.  "Lut" mechanism, however, causes the torpedo to describe a zig-zag track along the course of the target.  The diagram, sketched by the prisoner, illustrates the difference between the two settings.  In each case, the same relative U-Boat and target positions have been used.  In this case, with "Fat" mechanism there is no greater chance of hitting the target than if a normal torpedo had been fixed, whereas "Lut" mechanism offers several chances of hitting.  
          "Lut" requires additional external tube setting gear.  Once so fitted, the tube can no longer be used for firing normal electric torpedoes.  The new setting enables the first curve of the torpedo's track to be from 0° to 360°, the length of the arc depending on the estimated course of the target.  (N.I.D. Note.  See plate for relative tracks of torpedoes employing "Fat" (Curly) with "Lut" mechanisms.  In C.B. 04051(64), Plate I illustrated a possible track of a torpedo fitted with "Curly" mechanism.)  
          " Lut" I  
          "Lut" I mechanism is fitted to a T 3a torpedo.  (N.I.D. Note.  The T 3a torpedo is believed to be the same as T 3 except for an increase in the size of the battery.)  After the first "curl" the "curly" track consists of a series of semi-circles, the torpedo running directly from one into the other, with no straight run in between.  The radius of these semi-circles is 95 m. (104 yds.).  The first "curl" starts at the intersection of the torpedo's straight run and target's course and its length depends on the targets course.  
          "Lut"  II  
          "Lut" II mechanism is stated to be a variant for use in air torpedoes, which are intended to be fired only at night.  No information as to track could be obtained.  
          (N.I.D. Note.  Torpedoes fitted with "Lut" mechanism may be suited to firing from dead ahead or astern of a ship.  They probably involve the fitting of a new computer, or at least a modification.)  
          (e)  Steel Torpedo Tubes  
          A torpedoman from U.744 had seen steel torpedo tubes at a torpedo school.  They appeared to be almost identical to the manganese and bronze tubes.  He was told that the only reason for their manufacture was the shortage of copper in Germany.  They were coated with an anti-corrosion preparation to prevent rusting.  
  (xiv)  Contact Keeping Buoy (Fü Bo)  
          Contact keeping buoys are said to emit five different coloured lights, viz., green, red, white blue and yellow, each having a different purport.  When the buoys are streamed from a U-Boat a short warning signal is made by the boat.  
  (xv)  Bathythermometer  
          U.744 carried a bathythermometer on the starboard side of the control room for taking sea water temperature.  It had a direct connection with the sea.  Temperatures were logged at least once a day.  The purpose was said to be to determine the best torpedo depth setting and to test temperature effect on hydrophones.  (N.I.D. Note.  The torpedo reason is not apparent.)  
     
     

 

 

 
 
 
21
 
     
  (xvi)  Infra-red Precautions
          Infra-red precautions throughout the German Navy have been relaxed, according to a prisoner from U.744 because of the belief that the enemy no longer uses infra-red searchlights.  Originally a white anti-infra-red paint was used on U-Boats.  This was later replaced by a grey paint.  Now both forms have been abandoned.  
     
  (xvii)  37 mm. Automatic Guns  
          A number of prisoners complained of the new fully automatic 37 mm. gun.  One stated that it frequently jammed because of the poorly designed rammer.  Another felt that the gun was too light, was carelessly made and was suffering from growing pains.  The maximum range of this gun was stated to be 7,000 metres (7,645 yds.) but the maximum effective range only 5,000 metres (5,468 yds.).  (For list of gun's parts and tool carried in U.744 see Part VI, Appendix "C.")  
     
  (xviii)  Minefields  
          German coastal minefields are said by an officer from U.744 to consist mostly of acoustic mines.  
     
  (xix)  U-Boat Tactics  
          It was stated that determined efforts were being made to reinforce the U-Boat situation in the Mediterranean.  According to an officer from U.744, four U-Boats sailed from the 9th Flotilla at Brest at the end of February, 1944.  He had heard that all of them had arrived safely at a Mediterranean base.  
     
  (xx)  Bridge Armour  
        Armoured shelters known as "coal scuttles" (Kohlenkasten) were carried on the bridge of U.91 on her penultimate patrol.  They were removed as they tended to make the boat top heavy.  (See C.B. 04051(99), Section VI (xiii). )
     
  (xxi)  U-Boat Personnel  
          An ordinary seaman in U.257 had originally served as a S.B.A. but in June, 1943, he and about 150 other S.B.A.s were transferred as seamen to the U-Boat arm.  They received very little training in the new service.  
     
  (xxii)  Invasion Plans  
          A prisoner from U.386 stated that in case of invasion U-Boat personnel at bases are to be equipped with green uniforms and armed with rifles and grenades.  They will be employed as infantrymen.  
     
  (xxiii)  Japanese Activities  
          Prisoners from U.744 stated that at least one and possibly as many as seven Japanese submarine crews consisting of about 50 men each were in Danzig in October, 1943.  They were standing by new construction at the Schichauwerft.  One prisoner believed that they had replaced Italian crews formerly there and were to take over German U-Boats.  He thought that they were soon to leave on patrol.  The Japanese were accommodated in the depôt ships "DEUTSCHLAND" and "HAMBURG."  
          A Japanese submarine was seen in Brest in February, 1944, by Prisoners from U.744.  She had two decks, one above the other, two W/T offices, and two aircraft, both in hangars, one forward and one abaft the conning-tower.  It was stated that Japanese submarines in German held bases carry their own repair staff.  Only German welders are allowed aboard.  
          It was stated that German U-Boat personnel are being recruited for service in the Far East.  They are required to sign on for five years.  
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

 

 
 
 
22
 
     
 
II.  U-BOAT BUILDING YARDS AND BASES
     
  (i)  Brest  
          In February, 1944, U.744 lay in the south-west end of a new shelter.  A prisoner said that there were four or five wet pens in this section of the shelter.  Each could accommodate three 500-ton U-Boats and was probably long enough to berth a 1,200 tonner.  The north-east end of the shelter was being excavated for additional pens.  
          The U-Boat shelters are being armed with flak guns, anti-tank guns and M.G.s.  They are equipped with heavy steel doors and are protected from low flying planes by barrage balloons.  The entrance to the port is protected by a net.  
          K. K. LEHMAN-WILLENBROCK is still S.O. of the 9th Flotilla.  The Flotilla Engineer Officer is Klt. (Ing.) HERING.  
     
  (ii)  Danzig  
          The 8th and 23rd Flotillas are based on Danzig.  The 23rd is a topedo-firing Flotilla.  (Schiess-flotille) and has only recently been formed in the Baltic.  The S.O. of the 8th Flotilla is Korvettenkapitän SCHMIDT.  The Flotilla badge is a U-Boat superimposed on a "V."  (N.I.D. Note.  The 23rd Flotilla was formerly at Salamis.  Prisoners have stated that it had been absorbed by the 29th Flotilla at Toulon.)  
     
  (iii)  Flensburg (Holstein)  
          A prisoner from U.744 said that between six and seven thousand men are stationed at the various naval establishments at Flensburg.  Normally about five U-Boats are building simultaneously at the Flensburger Schiffsbau.  
     
(iv)  Hel.
          The depot ship "ODIN" former headquarters of the Agrufront has been moved to Pillau or Gdynia.  Her place at Hel has been taken by "PREUSSEN."  The Engineer Officer's school is now under Klt. (ing.) TEICHMANN.  
         Early in 1943 the floating dock, said formerly to be used in connection with small U-Boats, were towed out to sea and deliberately sunk.  
     
  (v)  Kiel  
          U-Boat pens are being built in Kiel.  
     
  (vi)  Lorient  
          When U.257 was in Lorient in December, 1943, there were 15 to 20, 740-ton U-Boats in port.  
     
  (vii)  Memel  
          The S.O. of the 24th Flotilla, a training flotilla at Memel, was said to be Korvettenkapitän MERTENS.  
     
  (viii)  Vegesack  
          A prisoner from U.257 stated that the Vulkan Yard at Vegesack was told in September, 1943, to complete the U-Boats then building and then to stop U-Boat production.  They were to build locomotives instead.  (N.I.D. Note.  There is no confirmation that locomotives are building at this yard.)  
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
  (C2861)  Wt. 16770-4012   500  7/44  G.S.St.  Gp. 338  
     
     

 


 

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