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In reply refer to Initials

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  Op-16-Z  
     
     
 

NAVY DEPARTMENT

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS

WASHINGTON

 
     
     
     
     
 
O.N.I. 250 – G/Serial 16
 
 
 
 
 
 

REPORT ON THE

INTERROGATION OF SURVIVORS FROM U-67

SUNK ON 16 JULY 1943

 
     
 
Lt. Kuhn
 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
  16 August 1943  
     
     

 

 
 
     
 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
 
 
Chapter
I.
  INTRODUCTORY REMARKS
       
 
II.
  CREW OF U-67
       
 
III.
  EARLY HISTORY OF U-67
       
 
IV.
  FIRST WAR CRUISE OF U-67
       
 
V.
  SECOND WAR CRUISE OF U-67
       
 
VI.
  THIRD WAR CRUISE OF U-67
       
 
VII.
  FOURTH WAR CRUISE OF U-67
       
 
VIII.
  FIFTH WAR CRUISE OF U-67
       
 
IX
  SIXTH WAR CRUISE OF U-67
       
 
X.
  SEVENTH WAR CRUISE OF U-67
       
 
XI.
  EIGHTH WAR CRUISE OF U-67
       
 
XII.
  DISAPPEARANCE OF U-67
       
 
XIII.
  DETAILS OF U-67
       
 
XIV.
  GENERAL REMARKS ON U-BOATS
       
 
XV.
  U-BOAT BASES
       
 
XVI.
  MISCELLANNOUS
 
 
 
 

ANNEX A.

CREW LIST OF U-67
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Chapter I.  INTRODUCTORY REMARKS
 
 
 
 
        U-67, under command of Kapitänleutnant* Günther Müller, was attacked by an aircraft from USS Core 16 July 1943 in position 30007' N., 44026'W.  The boat disappeared beneath the water and the four members of the bridge watch were left swimming on the surface.  An officer and two men were rescued by USS McCormick.  They were later transferred to USS Merrimack and arrived in the United States for questioning 25 July 1943.
 
 
 
 
        The three prisoners were unusually well trained in security and were extremely suspicious of their interrogators.  The two ratings eventually responded to interrogation.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
*  For translation of ranks and rating in U-67, see Annex A.
 
 
 
 
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Chapter II.  CREW OF U-67
 
 
 
 
        The complement of U-67 was 51 of which four were officers.  Korvettenkapitän Bleichrodt of the 1931 naval term was captain of U-67 during her trials and first patrol.  Bleichrodt entered the U-boat arm in 1939 and in fall of 1940 he was given command of U-48, famous as the "most successful U-boat".  He made several trips with U-48 and was awarded the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross in October 1940.  Bleichrodt was probably given command of U-67 in December 1940 and was relieved by Günther Müller in May 1941.
 
 
 
 
        Kapitänleutnant Günther Müller was still in command of U-67 when she disappeared.  His family owns an estate near Braunschweig.  He entered the Naval Academy in 1934 and, after graduation, served on the training ship Schlesien.  On 1 April 1937, while still aboard Schlesien, Müller was promoted to Leutnant.  In 1938 he was put in charge of a small training group at the Academy.  In 1939 Müller entered the U-boat arm and 1 April was promoted to Oberleutnant.  In April or May 1941 he was made captain of U-67.  The prisoners from U-67 were extravagant in their praise of Müller.  They stated that he was an excellent officer, friendly, good humored, and had the interests of the crew at heart.  One of the prisoners spoke of his mechanical ability, saying that he once designed a mechanical toy for the five year old child of the Engineer Officer.  He had the toy built by the engine room ratings.  Müller's nickname was said to be "Alligator".
 
 
 
 
        The Executive Officer of U-67 was Leutnant Walter Otto of the 1939 naval term, one of the three prisoners.  He was born 10 September 1920 at Clow.  His father was a federal judge, hearing criminal cases in
 
 
 
 
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Württenberg.  Otto entered the Naval Academy in 1939.  (O.N.I. Note:  His name does not appear in the German Navy List of 1940.  He is not to be confused with Leutnant Walter Otto of the April 1937 naval term.)  After graduation, he served for a time on surface vessels.  He joined U-67 in September 1942 as Second Watch officer.  In April 1943 he was made Executive Officer and was scheduled to go to the commanding officers school after the eighth patrol of U-67, in August 1943.  Otto is a typical Nazi - suspicious, sullen, taciturn, and devoid of manners.  He said hardly a word to his interrogators and refused to believe their statements as to the progress of the war.  He was security conscious to such a degree that he remained silent on all subjects except those that concerned his own personal desires.
 
 
 
 
        The Second Watch officer was said to be either Lange or Langer.  (O.N.I. Note:  The only Langer in the German Navy List of 1940 is a medical officer.  There are seven officers named Lange in the 1940 Navy List, listed as Leutnant sur See.  None of these can be identified as the man in question.)  
 
 
 
 
        The Engineer officer was Oberleutnant (Ing.) Eckhardt.  Eckhardt started his naval career as a seaman.  He served for a time on mine sweepers as was a machinist on Karlsruhe when she made her world cruise.  He was a warrant machinist under the famous Kretschmer on U-99 shortly before she was sunk in March 1941.  The prisoners said that he was on his tenth U-boat patrol when they were captured.  They were under the impression that he was shortly to receive the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross.  He was described as a very nervous man and was not very popular with the crew.
 
 
 
 
        The two other prisoners from U-67 showed evidence of strong indoctrination in security.  Bootsmaat Bruck is a native of Frankfurt a/M.
 
 
 
 
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He is 22 years of age and, before joining the navy, was an eel fisherman.  He was a member of the Nazi Party and once belonged to the S.A.  After completing his training as a recruit, Burck was assigned to U-67 without having attended U-boat school.  He joined U-67 in May 1941, but, because his health was poor, he made only four patrols - the second, fourth, fifth, and eighth.
 
 
 
 
        The last of the three prisoners is 19 year old Matrosengefreiter Janek.  He is a native of Fesstenberg near Breslau, and was a house painter in civilian life.  Janek joined the navy in December 1941, received the usual recruit training, and then attended the U-boat school at Gotenhafen for three months.  He was assigned to U 67 in September 1942 and made the sixth, seventh, and eighth patrols in her.
 
 
 
 
        Both Burck and Janek believed implicitly all the anti-British atrocity stories that are currently circulating in Germany.  Burck was particularly graphic in his descriptions of the "British war against women and children".  He spoke of poisoned candy, incendiary handkerchiefs, and explosive fountain pens dropped from airplanes and swore that his own brother had his head blown off by such a pen.  Both prisoners expressed relief at having fallen into American rather than British hands.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Chapter III.  EARLY HISTORY OF U-67
 
 
 
 
        U-67 was a 750-ton U-boat, type IX A, built at the Deschimag Seebeck yard, Wesermünde.  She belonged to the series U-64 to U-68 assigned to this yard.  She was commissioned in December 1940 or early January 1941.  Her first commanding officer was Korvettenkapitän Bleichrodt.
 
 
 
 
        Nothing definite could be learned of her trials, as none of the prisoners was aboard at that time.  It was stated, however, that the trials were held in the Baltic.  One of the prisoners had heard of an incident which took place during the Agru-Front (Active Service Training Group).  The boat dived at 450 angle and some of the batteries, being improperly wedged, slipped out of place resulting in a few cracked battery cases.  The dates of the completion of the trials and of the period of final overhaul could not be ascertained.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Chapter IV.  FIRST WAR CRUISE OF U-67
 
 
 
 
        The first war cruise of U-67 must have been a brief one, although, as in the case of the early history of the boat, no exact information could be obtained.  One of the prisoners believed that the cruise must have taken place in the North Sea.  The commanding officer was still Bleichrodt.  The Executive Officer was Oberleutnant Pfeffer of the 1934 naval term, and the Engineer Officer was Oberleutnant (Ing.) Wiebe of the 1935 naval term.
 
 
 
 
        The cruise probably ended sometime in April 1941 when U-67 put in at Wilhelmshaven.  Here, according to one prisoner, the boat was given a coating of long, thin, rubber strips, described as about one meter wide each.  They were applied to the conning tower to the sides of the boat, but not to the deck.  The prisoner did not know how far down the sides they extended.  They were clamped and cemented in place and were painted the same color as the boat.  They were so inconspicuous that the prisoner said he would never have noticed them, if his attention had not been called to them.
 
 
 
 
        By 15 May 1941, U-67 was in Kiel where one of the prisoners joined her.  About 10 days later she sailed into the Baltic where her new rubber coating was tested, presumably against asdic.  The prisoner was aboard until 8 June 1941 when he became ill and was hospitalized aboard the depot ship Wilhelm Bauer at Gotenhafen.  By 1 July 1941, U-67 was back in Kiel where she was rejoined by the prisoner.  The prisoner stated that by this time Bleichrodt had been replaced as captain by Günther Müller.  The Executive officer was Oberleutnant Bauer.  (O.N.I. Note:  This was probably Hermann Bauer of the 1936 naval term.)  The Second Watch Officer was Leutnant von der Gröben and the Engineer Officer was still Wiebe.
 
 
 
 
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(O.N.I. Note:  The name von der Gröben does not appear in the German Naval List of 1940.)
 
 
 
 
        During most of July 1941, U-67 lay at Kiel.  The rubber strips were removed from all parts of the boat except the conning tower and the bow.  Further experiments and sound trials were made in the Little Belt but they presumably proved unsatisfactory, as all the rubber was subsequently removed.  Toward the end of the month, U-67 loaded supplies and ammunition in preparation for her next cruise.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Chapter V.  SECOND WAR CRUISE OF U-67
 
 
 
 
        U-67 sailed from Kiel late in July 1941 on her second war cruise, her first under Günther Müller.  The U-boat proceeded to Bergen, where she lay over for one day, and then sailed to her operational area, stated to have been in the North Atlantic.
 
 
 
 
        On this cruise U-67 met with no success whatsoever.  After having been out little more than a month, she put in at Lorient where she was attached to the 2nd Flotilla.  She remained in port for a short time and about 20 September 1941 was ready for her next cruise.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Chapter VI.  THRID WAR CRUISE OF U-67
 
 
 
 
        The third patrol of U-67 is rather difficult to reconstruct, as none of the prisoners was present.  According to statements made by prisoners from U-111, U-67 must have sailed from Lorient about 20 September 1941 with plans for an extended cruise.  (O.N.I. Note:  U-111 was sunk on 4 October 1941 in approximate position 27015'N., 20027'W.  See C.B. 04051/32.)  According to them, shortly after U-67 sailed, it was discovered that one of the radiomen had V.D.  The illness of this man was confirmed by one prisoner from U-67, but denied by another.  Prisoners from U-111 stated that a rendezvous was arranged with U-67 for the purpose of removing the radioman.  On 28 September 1941, however, at about 0330 off the Cape Verde Isles, U-67 rammed H.M.S. Submarine Clyde.  (A full description of this event is given in C.B. 04051/32.)
 
 
 
 
        Statements regarding the subsequent events are conflicting.  Prisoners from U-111 stated that U-67 sustained considerable damage as a result of the ramming and had to return to port.  They said that U-111 met U-67 and took on oil and torpedoes from the latter.  Since U-67 was bound for port, there was no need to take off the case of V.D.  All of this is vigorously denied by a prisoner from U-67.  He insisted that the damage was slight and that U-67 remained at sea.  He was aware of a meeting with another U-boat but did not know her number nor the purpose of the meeting.
 
 
 
 
        This prisoner stated that on this patrol, U-67 participated in the attack on Convoy H.G. 76, which took place 14-23 December 1941.  (A complete description of this attack can be found in CB. 04050/42(1).)  He said that
 
 
 
 
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the U-boat was called from her operational area by signal from the Admiral in command of U-boats.  The signal warned Müller that the convoy might be a U-boat trap but that he should attack without regard to possible consequences.  The prisoner said that six other U-boats were present, among them being those commanded by Kapitänleutnants Bigalk and Endrass.  (O.N.I. Note:  It is known that Bigalk commanded U 751 and Endrass, U 567 at that time, and that Endrass and his boat were lost in this attack.)  During the operation, he said that five of the seven U-boats were sunk, U-67 and Bigalk's boat being the only ones to escape.  U-67 was vigorously depth charged, but the prisoner stated that she used her S.B.T. to good effect, and that this device was responsible for her escape.
 
 
 
 
        U-67 returned to Lorient 24 December 1941 and some three weeks later left on her next patrol.  During this period, a new Executive Officer came to the boat, Oberleutnant Fiehn of the 1935 naval term.  (O.N.I. Note:  According to statements of one prisoner from U-67 who was not present on this cruise, the third patrol lasted from about 20 September 1941 to 24 December 1941.  It is possible that the boat made two cruises during this period and that, in fact, the prisoners from U-111 were correct in stating that U-67 returned to port after ramming H.M.Submarine Clyde 28 September 1941.) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Chapter VII.  FOURTH WAR CRUISE OF U-67
 
 
 
 
        U-67 sailed from Lorient on her fourth patrol 19 January 1942.  She headed directly for her operational area in the Caribbean.  After being out 14 days, Müller designed a conning tower device -- a chamois and a star.  He painted it on the conning tower with his own hands.  Prisoners stated that whenever the paint needed renewing, Müller insisted on doing it himself.  The U-boat met with considerable success, sinking three ships, all sailing out of convoy.  The estimated total tonnage sunk was 28,000.  The ships were described as two freighters and one tanker.  The tanker was identified as SS Penelope, which was hit by three torpedoes at about 2000  E.W.T., 13 March 1942 in approximate position 150S., 640W.
 
 
 
 
         The prisoners stated that during this patrol, U-67 was not attacked, and the cruise was described as a quiet one.  The U-boat put in at Lorient 30 March 1942.  Here she entered drydock for repairs.  She remained in port for about seven weeks.  During this period, the Engineer Officer Wiebe was replaced by Oberleutnant (Ing.) Merdens.  (O.N.I. Note:  This name does not appear in the German Naval List of 1940.)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Chapter VIII.  FIFTH WAR CRUISE OF U-67
 
 
 
 
        The fifth war cruise of U-67 was her most successful.  She sailed from Lorient 20 May 1942 and headed for the Gulf of Mexico which was the operational area assigned to her.  She remained in the Gulf until July, sinking eight ships totaling 48,000 tons.  It was said that all of these ships were sailing out of convoy.
 
 
 
 
        A prisoner told of an occasion on this patrol when the U-boat was about to make an attack by night.  An aircraft suddenly appeared and turned on its searchlight, but U-67 submerged without being discovered.
 
 
 
 
        The prisoner was able to identify only two of the eight ships attacked.  One was SS Managua, which was torpedoed and sunk at 2145 E.W.T., 15 June 1942 in position 23050'N., 81040'W.  The other was the attack on SS Paul H. Harwood at 0330 E.W.T., 7 July 1942 in 29026'N., 88038'W.  The ship was struck by one torpedo and sent out a distress signal enabling U-67 to identify her victim.  Paul H. Harwood was not sunk, however, but wa able to make port under her own power.
 
 
 
 
        U-67, with her torpedoes exhausted and her oil supply low, returned to her base, proceeding at slow speed, Diesel-electric.  About 1 August 1942, while nearing the Bay of Biscay, it was stated that U-67 was sighted and attacked by an aircraft.  The U-boat dived just as the bombs fell and only slight damage was sustained.  A few instruments were broken and the power-operated clutch was put out of order, necessitating the use of the emergency hand operated gear.  (O.N.I. Note:  This was probably the attack on a U-boat made by a Sunderland at 1609Z, 1 August 1942 in 46048'N., 13049'W.)  The U-boat was able to proceed under her own power
 
 
 
 
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and made Lorient 8 August 1942.  She remained in port until late September preparing for her next patrol.  A new group of officers came to the boat at this time.  The new Executive Officer was Oberleutnant Herwartz (O.N.I. Note:  This may be Oskar Herwartz of the 1935 naval term), the Second Watch Officer was Leutnant Otto, and the Engineer Officer was Oberleutnant (Ing.) Eckhardt.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Chapter IX.  SIXTH WAR CRUISE OF U-67
 
 
 
 
        U-67 sailed from Lorient about 16 September 1942 on her sixth war cruise.  While passing through the Bay of Biscay, it was stated that she was attacked by a British aircraft.  The U-boat dived, reaching a depth of about 100 meters as five bombs were dropped.  The bombs fell 30 or 40 meters away from the U-boat, which sustained no damage.  (O.N.I. Note:  It has not been possible to identify this attack.  No aircraft attack was made in the Bay of Biscay shortly after 16 September, the first being 2 October 1942.)
 
 
 
 
        U-67 proceeded to her operational area, which was stated to have been off Trinidad.  Here, according to a prisoner, contact was made with a U-boat commanded by Kapitänleutnant Lassen of the 1935 naval term.  The two boats operated together for a time.  The prisoner said that U-67 sank four ships totaling 24,000 tons and damaged two others.  Several of the attacks were described by the prisoner in some detail.  One, he said, was an attack on a freighter loaded with cotton.  The U-boat approached her target just after sunset and fired two torpedoes at a range of about 1200 meters.  Both torpedoes hit, but as the ship did not sink, Müller gave the order to approach close at periscope depth.  The U-boat then started to surface only to find herself on a collision course, too late to avoid being rammed.  The freighter struck the U-boat, damaging both periscopes and jamming the conning tower hatch fast.  The merchantman continued at slow speed under her own power and Müller gave orders to follow her.  She finally was sunk with two more torpedoes.  (O.N.I. Note:  It has not been possible to identify the freighter nor to verify any of these incidents.)  The damage to U-67 was repaired at sea and the U-boat continued on her patrol.
 
 
 
 
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        On 15 November 1942, U-67 attacked and sank SS King Arthur at 0419 GCT in approximate position 10030'N., 59050'W.  The U-boat fired two torpedoes and then was forced to submerge because of the presence of an airplane.  Survivors of King Arthur stated that the ship was struck by four torpedoes, and suggested that another U-boat attacked the ship at the same time.  This may have been the boat commanded by Lassen.
 
 
 
 
        According to a prisoner, torpedoes were brought down from the upper deck containers sometime during November.  During the operation, a member of the crew loosened a screw on the cover of one of the containers.  The cover flew open, striking him on the chest and killing him instantly.
 
 
 
 
        At 1930 GCT, 18 November 1942, U-67 torpedoed and sank the Norwegian freighter Torgugas.  Only one torpedo was fired, and the ship sank very rapidly.  The crew of U-67 came on deck and watched the crew of the freighter fight for space on the lifeboat.  Among the survivors was the captain, his wife, and the chief engineer.  The master and the engineer officer were taken aboard the U-boat and questioned.  Müller attempted to convert the Norwegian captain to the Nazi cause, but he remained firm and insisted that he would maintain his allegiance to the English flag.
 
 
 
 
        On 28 November 1942, her torpedo supply exhausted, U-67 attacked SS Empire Glade by gun fire at 0453Z in 17016'N., 48044'W.  Several hits with the 10.5cm. gun were scored but the ship escaped.  A second ship was attacked some days later with similar results.  A prisoner said that she escaped in a smoke screen.
 
 
 
 
        Early in December, U-67 left her operational area and proceeded toward Lorient.  On the way, in the neighborhood of the Azores, she was met by U-459, a supply U-boat commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wilanowitz-Möllendorf.  (O.N.I. Note:  U-459 was sunk 24 July, 1943.)
 
 
 
 
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U-67 arrived in Lorient on 21 December 1942.  There she entered the drydock for repairs, and some of the crew were given leave.  Several members of the crew were sent to the anti-aircraft gunnery school at Mimizan for a brief course of instruction.  Müller had been notified while at sea of his award of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross.  After his boat was safely berthed, he went to Paris with Kapitänleutnant Emmermann of the 1934 naval term and Kapitänleutnant Büchting of the 1935 naval term.  There the three officers were presented with medals.  Büchting was commander of a motor torpedo boat and received the Knight Cross of the Iron Cross for successful operations in the Black Sea.  Shortly before U-67 was ready to sail on her next patrol, Herwartz was replaced as Executive Officer by Oberleutnant Krankenhagen of the 1936 naval term.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Chapter X.  SEVENTH WAR CRUISE OF U-67
 
 
 
 
        The seventh patrol of U-67 lasted only about five weeks.  She sailed from Lorient 13 March 1943 and headed for her operational area off the west coast of Africa.  Here she received orders from the Admiral in Command of U-boats to join a number of other U-boats in an attack on a convoy.  Among there boats was one commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Witte (U-509).  Another was commanded by Kapitänleutnant Emmermann of the 1934 naval term.  According to a prisoner, as U-67 was following the convoy, she sighted a straggler.  Müller maneuvered his boat into attack position and was just about to shoot when his target exploded and sank.  It was later discovered that Witte had sunk the freighter.  (O.N.I. Note:  This ship may have been SS James W. Denner, a straggler from Convoy UGS 7, torpedoed and sunk 11 April 1943 in the vicinity of the Azores.)
 
 
 
 
        Müller finally reached the convoy and, wishing to attack from its center, ordered U-67 to dive.  The boat proceeded submerged for some distance and then came to periscope depth in the middle of the convoy.  Feeling that the U-boat was at too shallow a depth, the Engineer Officer gave the order to flood 200 liters in the negative buoyancy tank.  The order was misunderstood, and 200 liters were pumped.  U-67 broke surface with her conning tower but, apparently was not sighted by any of the ships in the convoy.  The Engineer Officer then hurriedly gave the order to flood all tanks.  U-67 plummeted out of control, diving to a depth of 240 meters before trim could be recovered.  The terrific water pressure cause considerable damage.  The upper deck containers were stove in, a torpedo became jammed in the tube, several of the vents were broken, and water entered the boat through the Diesel exhaust valve.  U-67 ascended to 180 meters and
 
 
 
 
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remained at that depth until all danger of discovery by the convoy escort wa passed.  She then surfaced.  Müller reported the damage and was ordered to return to Lorient.  On the way, U-67 met the U-boat commanded by Emmermann and transferred some of her oil.
 
 
 
 
        U-67 arrived in Lorient 16 April 1943.  She remained in port less than a month undergoing repairs.  The 3.7 cm. after deck gun was removed, and a new 2 cm. anti-aircraft gun was installed on the bandstand.  Krakenhagen was relieved of his duties as Executive Officer, and Leutnant Otto was promoted to this position.  Leutnant Lange joined the boat as Second Watch Officer.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Chapter XI.  EIGHTH WAR CRUISE OF U-67
 
 
 
 
        U-67 sailed from Lorient on her eighth war cruise at about 1800, 10 May 1943.  She was scheduled to leave earlier, but one of the engine room petty officers became ill, and her departure was delayed until a replacement was found.  While passing through the Bay of Biscay, airplanes were sighted, and the U-boat submerged before an attack could be made.
 
 
 
 
        U-67 proceeded to her operational area in the Caribbean.  Here it was discovered that her G.S.R. was out of order and no one on board was capable of repairing it.  This was duly reported to the Admiral in Charge of U-boats, who ordered U-67 to a new patrol area between the coast of the United States and Bermuda.  Later a signal was received to the effect that a 750-ton U-boat was leaving Lorient with a new G.S.R. for U-67.
 
 
 
 
        U-67 headed for her new hunting ground.  On the way, Müller ordered two charges fired from the S.B.T.  The radiomen were instructed to study the sound effects carefully.
 
 
 
 
        It was stated that about the middle of June, U-67 sighted and attacked a freighter.  A salvo of two torpedoes was fired, but the ship suddenly stopped and both torpedoes missed.  Müller followed the freighter for a while and then fired a spread of four torpedoes.  Again the freighter stopped but the prisoners saw one torpedo explode.  They were surprised to see the ship proceed apparently without damage.
 
 
 
 
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        U-67 continued her patrol off Bermuda.  Several airplanes were sighted, but the U-boat dived before being seen.  According to the prisoners, she met the 750-ton U-boat carrying the new G.S.R. somewhere in mid-Atlantic.  The set was installed in the radio room, and U-67 began her homeward trip.
 
 
 
 
        In the middle of July, many bales of crude rubber were seen floating in the water.  Müller ordered several of them to be picked up and made fast to the deck.
 
 
 
 
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Chapter XII.  DISAPPEARANCE OF U-67*
 
 
 
 
        In the morning of 16 July 1943, U-67 was proceeding on the surface.  The Executive Officer and three ratings were on the bridge watch.  The G.S.R. was not manned.  An aircraft from USS Core surprised the U-boat in position 30007'N., 44026'W. and closed for attack.  The men on the bridge watch tried to man the 2 cm. anti-aircraft gun, but four or five bombs were dropped before they could do so.  The bombs were described as near misses, falling aft.  One prisoner said that the force of the explosion flung him into the water.  The other two prisoners stated that the U-boat submerged, leaving them floating in the water.  One of them stated that the boat sank at a 450 angle.  None of then was sure whether the conning tower hatch was closed before the U-boat disappeared beneath the surface.  At 0630Z three of the four men on watch were rescued by USS McCormick.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
*  In the absence of an action report, this chapter is based entirely on the statements of the three prisoners.
 
 
 
 
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Chapter XIII.  DETAILS OF U-67
 
 
 
 
TONNAGE.
 
 
 
 
        750 tons.
 
 
 
 
TYPE.
 
 
 
 
        IX C.
 
 
 
 
BUILDING YARD.
 
 
 
 
        Deschimag Seebeck, Wesermünde.
 
 
 
 
FLOTILLA.
 
 
 
 
        2nd, at Lorient.
 
 
 
 
DIESEL ENGINES.
 
 
 
 
        MAN.  Stated to develop 2500 H.P. each.
 
 
 
  ELECTRIC MOTORS.  
     
          AEG.  Stated to develop 500 H.P. each.  
     
  S.B.T.  
     
         Fitted.  Located in the head, aft.  Twenty containers of ammunition carried.  
     
  G.S.R.   
     
         Fitted.  The new net-type antenna was used.  
     
  ARMAMENT.  
     
          Four torpedo tubes forward and two aft.  One 10.5 cm. deck gun forward.  Two model C-38, 2 cm. anti-aircraft guns carried, one in reserve  
     
 
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and one mounted on the bandstand.  Four light machine guns carried, two in reserve.  The 3.7 cm. after deck gun was removed before the eighth patrol.
 
 
 
 
TORPEDOES.
 
 
 
 
        Twenty-three carried, fifteen electric and eight air.  Six were carried in the tubes, six were in the bow compartment below the floor plates and two above them, three were in the after torpedo room, and eight in the upper deck containers.  The pistols were four-wiskered G7h.  The air torpedoes had six-bladed propellers, and electric torpedoes, two bladed propellers.  No F.A.T.s were carried.
 
 
 
 
CONING TOWER DEVICE.
 
 
 
 
        U-boat with Flash of Lightening.  Device of 2nd Flotilla, Lorient.
 
 
 
 
PATRON.
 
 
 
 
        Under Bleichrodt the patron was Reichskriegsbund.  It was stated under Müller, the workers of the Lorient repair shops represented by Korvettenkapitän Holland, adopted the boat.  (O.N.I. Note:  This name does not appear in the German Naval List of 1940.)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Chapter XIV.  GENERAL REMARKS ON U-BOATS
 
 
 
 
        A prisoner stated that passage through the Bay of Biscay has become an extremely nerve racking experience.  In an attempt to combat the menace of aircraft attacks, one or more 500-ton U-boats have been fitted with two quadruple 2 cm. guns and one 3.7 anti-aircraft gun.  These boats cruise about in the Bay of Biscay with orders never to dive when sighted by aircraft but to stay on the surface and fight.  Another prisoner stated that often, when a U-boat approaches its base, it is met by such an snit-surface boat, which acts as an escort.
 
 
 
 
BLOCKADE RUNNING.
 
 
 
 
        A prisoner stated that U-boats rather than surface ships are now being favored as blockade runners.  He said that 10 May 1943, a 750-ton U-boat sailed from Lorient for the Far East.  She was said to have carried a secret cargo, packed in circular containers which were stowed in the torpedo tubes.  She was to stop first at Singapore and then proceed to Japan.  Her homeward bound cargo was to be tungsten.
 
 
 
  10.5 GUNS.
 
 
 
 
        A prisoner who had been in command of the gun crew serving the 10.5 cm. gun, stated that this weapon could be elevated to an angle of almost 90.  He said that his crew could fire between 15 and 18 shots per minute.  The record was 24 shots per minute.
 
 
 
 
RAIDERS.
 
 
 
 
        It was stated that Raider 28 commanded by Kapitän sur See Helmuth
 
 
 
 
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von Ruckteschall is the only Raider now at sea.  Raider 28 left a French port the end of February 1943.
 
 
 
 
TACTICS.
 
 
 
 
        It was stated that Günther Müller always took his boat down to 180 meters when under attack by surface craft.  When U-67 was attacked by aircraft, he dived to 80 to 100 meters.  He established a rule regarding aircraft attacks.  If the plane was first sighted when it was so far away that it could be seen only with binoculars, the U-boat would dive.  If, however, it was so close, when first sighted, that it could be seen with the naked eye, the U-boat would remain on the surface and fight.
 
 
 
 
        The prisoners believed that allied convoys had recently been re-routed.  They said that they all go south-west of the Azores.
 
 
 
 
NEW BOATS.
 
 
 
 
        A prisoner stated that he was sure that boats with numbers over 1200 were in use.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Chapter XV.  U-BOAT BASES
 
 
 
 
GOTENHAFEN.
 
 
 
 
        The commanding officer of the second division of the U-boat school at Gotenhafen was stated to be Kapitänleutnant (Ing.) Looschen of the 1927 naval term.  The commanding officer of the third company of this division was said to be Kapitänleutnant Stein.
 
 
 
 
KIEL.
 
 
 
 
        The depot ship, General Osorio was said to be at Kiel.  A U-boat artillery school is located on this ship.
 
 
 
 
LORIENT.
 
 
 
 
        A prisoner stated that one or two air raid shelters for naval and civilian personnel were located 2500 to 700 meters up stream from Saltiwedel Barracks.  The Lorient guard company is quartered in wooden barracks at Honnebont.
 
 
 
 
SWINEMÜNDE.
 
 
 
 
        A prisoner said that either Kapitänleutnant Jacobsen or Schiffe was commanding officer of the gunnery school at Swinemünde.  The school was small, consisting of only two squads.  (O.N.I. Note:  The name Schiffe is not in the German Naval List of 1940.  The officer in question is probably Johanes Jacobsen of the 1934 naval term.)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Chapter XVI.  MISCELLANEOUS
 
 
 
 
        The crew of U-67 listened to the Kameraschaftadienst broadcast on Tuesday and Friday evenings.  There was a collection of records on board and on Sundays a "concert" was held.  The men wrote down their preferences and these records were played.  The music was broadcast over the loud speaker system.  The concert lasted several hours so that men on duty in the Diesel compartment and those on bridge watch could be relieved in time to enjoy the music.  On Saturday nights or on Sundays, the men were given beer.  Beer was also served whenever a member of the crew had a birthday.
 
 
 
 
        A prisoner stated that in May 1943, Ukrainians of German extraction who had been imported into Frankfurt a/M. posted signs reading, "we are hungry.  Give us bread or send us home."  The S.S. were summoned and mass arrests of several hundred people were made.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Annex A.  CREW LIST OF U-67
 
 
 
 
Name
Rank
U.S.N. equivalent
Age
         
  Muller, Günther Kapitänleutnant Lieutenant  
* Otto, Walter Leutnant Ensign 22
  Lange Leutnant Ensign  
  Eckhardt Oberleutnant (Ing.) Lieutenant (jg) Engineering duties only  
  Weidemann Obersteuermann Warrant Quartermaster  
  Roder Obermaschinist Warrant machinist  
  Schmidt Obermaschinist Warrant machinist  
  Klein Oberbootsmaat Boatswain's mate 2cl  
  Gardemann Obermaschinenmaat Boatswain's mate 2cl  
  Hebe Obermaschinenmaat Boatswain's mate 2cl  
* Burck, Johann Bootsmaat Boatswain's mate 2cl 22
  Fiedler Bootsmaat Boatswain's mate 2cl  
  Bergmann Maschinenmaat Fireman 1cl  
  Frank Maschinenmaat Fireman 1cl  
  Kronauer Maschinenmaat Fireman 1cl  
  Riedel Maschinenmaat Fireman 1cl  
  Wahling Maschinenmaat Fireman 1cl  
  Ter Schuren Mechanikermaat Fireman 1cl  
  Sommer Funkmaat Radioman 3cl  
  Stork Funkmaat Radioman 3cl  
  Herrmann Matrosenobergefreiter Seaman 2cl  
  Kesper Matrosenobergefreiter Seaman 2cl  
  Koller Matrosenobergefreiter Seaman 2cl  
  Binder Maschinenobergefreiter Fireman 2cl  
  Harder Maschinenobergefreiter Fireman 2cl  
  Scholtz Maschinenobergefreiter Fireman 2cl  
  Seidler Maschinenobergefreiter Fireman 2cl  
  Alke Mechanikesobergefreiter Seaman 2cl  
  Pape Mechanikesobergefreiter Seaman 2cl  
  Schuhknecht Funkobergefreiter Seaman 2cl  
  Drobeck Matrosengefreiter Seaman 2cl  
* Janek, Walter Matrosengefreiter Seaman 2cl 19
  Ott Matrosengefreiter Seaman 2cl  
  Poscher Matrosengefreiter Seaman 2cl  
  Schwarze Matrosengefreiter Seaman 2cl  
  Weber Matrosengefreiter Seaman 2cl  
  Dietz Maschinengefreiter Fireman 3cl  
  Eiler Maschinengefreiter Fireman 3cl  
  Ellwanger Maschinengefreiter Fireman 3cl  
  Frahm Maschinengefreiter Fireman 3cl  
  Hromyk Maschinengefreiter Fireman 3cl  
         
 
 
 
 
*  Denotes survivors.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Name
Rank
U.S.N. equivalent
Age
         
  Kamlage Maschinengefreiter Fireman 3cl  
  Klein Maschinengefreiter Fireman 3cl  
  Krause Maschinengefreiter Fireman 3cl  
  Meyer Maschinengefreiter Fireman 3cl  
  Pfeiffer Maschinengefreiter Fireman 3cl  
  Thoma Maschinengefreiter Fireman 3cl  
  Dederichs Mechanikergefreiter Seaman 2cl  
  Klein Funkgefreiter Seaman 2cl  
  Raschkowski Matrose Apprentice seaman  
  Weingarten Matrose Apprentice seaman  
 
 
 
 
 
 
Summary of Crew
   
Officers  
4
Petty Officers  
16
Other ranks  
31
  Total
51
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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OTHER U-BOATS
 
 
 
 
U-boats Identified by Number:
 
 
 
 
U-43 This boat was said to have been in Lorient in April, 1942.
 
U-105 It was stated that the conning tower device of this boat was a swordfish.
 
U-156 It was reported that once during an engagement, the 10.5 cm. deck gun on the U-boat commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hartenstein of the 1928 naval term jammed.  Hartenstein himself worked on the gun, cleared it, and succeeded in sinking the ship under attack.  (O.N.I. Note:  It is believed that Hartenstein commands U-156.)
 
U-172 A U-boat commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl Emmermann was said to have operated with U-67 off the West coast of Africa in April, 1943.  (O.N.I. Note:  It is believed that Emmermann formerly commanded U-172.)  U 67 was damaged at that time and she met U-172 and transferred some of her oil to her.  Once when in the Bat of Biscay U-172 was attacked by two Sunderland aircraft.  U-172 remained on the surface and for twenty minutes fought off the attack using all her weapons, the 3.7 cm. gun, the 2 cm. gun, her machine guns, and even the 10.5 cm. gun.
 
U-226 Early in 1943 U-226 was said to have run onto a mine just outside of Lorient.  The boat was sunk and there were only 15 survivors.  At the time U-226 was returning from a twenty-one week patrol.
 
 
 
 
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U-311 It was stated that this boat was heavily damaged as the result of an aircraft attack in December, 1942.  (O.N.I. Note:  This statement should be treated with reserve as the existence of the series U-311 to U-330 has never been definitely established.)
 
U-505 It was stated that U-505 put into Lorient in December, badly damaged as the result of an airplane attack in the Bay of Biscay.  The 3.7 cm. gun had received a direct hit and was blown to pieces.  The bandstand was also blown away and there was a dent in the pressure hull abaft the conning tower.  U-505 then carried the device of an "axe".  This might indicate U-505 was still carrying Axel Olaf Loewe's device.  U-505 is said to have remained in Lorient for repairs until early June, 1943, at which time she again put out to sea.
 
U-D5 A prisoner said he saw U-D5 in Kiel in May, 1941.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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U-boats Identified by Commanding Officers:
 
 
 
 
U-Fiehn Oberleutnant Helmut Fiehn of the 1935 naval term is said to command his own U-boat, Fiehn was Executive Officer of U-67 during her fourth and fifth patrol, from January, 1942 to August, 1942.
 
U-Hartmann A 500-ton U-boat commanded by Hartmann is said to patrol the Bay of Biscay specifically as an anti-aircraft boat.  (O.N.I. Note:  This may be Kapitänleutnant Klaus Hartmann of the 1933 naval term who was graduated as an anti-aircraft officer.)  About the end of May, 1943 this boat reportedly shot down a Sunderland aircraft, and was herself somewhat damaged in the encounter.
 
U-Herwartz A prisoner stated that Kapitänleutnant Herwartz commands a U-boat.  Herwartz was the Executive Officer on U-67 during the latter's sixth war cruise, from 16 September, 1942 to 21 December, 1942.  Herwartz was promoted to Kapitänleutnant on this cruise.  (O.N.I. Note:  This is probably Oskar Herwartz of the 1935 naval term who returned from his first war cruise as commanding officer late April, 1943.)  It was stated that Herwartz had served in the German Air Force before joining the U-boat arm.
 
U-Krankenhagen A prisoner stated that Oberleutnant Detlef Krankenhagen is now in command of his own boat.  Krankenhagen was Executive Officer on U-67 during her seventh patrol, from 13 March to 16 April, 1943.  He left U-67 at the end of this cruise to attend the commanding officer's school.  He was described as a very large man.  His parents are said to live in South America.
 
 
 
 
 
 
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U-Lassen A U-boat commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Lassen was said to have operated with U-67 off Trinidad in October or November, 1942.  (O.N.I. Note:  In a broadcast in May, 1943, Lassen claims to have sunk 59,000 tons off Trinidad on his third patrol.)
 
U-Suhren Korvettenkapitän Reinhard "Teddy" Suhren is said to be in command of a new boat and he is supposed to sail to Japan.  (O.N.I. Note:  This information may confirm the statement found in the report on U-752 that Suhren commands a 1200-ton boat based on Bordeaux.)
 
U-Trojer Oberleutnant Trojer of the 1936 naval term is said to command a 500-ton U-boat.  Trojer is related by marriage to General von Bülow.  Trojer was Second Watch officer of U-67 on her first patrol, prior to May, 1941.
 
U-Witte A U-boat commanded by Witte operated with U-67 off the West Coast of Africa in March and April, 1943.  Witte torpedoed a straggler from a convoy just as U-67 was about to attack.  (O.N.I. Note:  This is probably Kapitänleutnant Helmut Witte of the 1934 naval term.)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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